Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, About the Series, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

This book exists because I’ve had the privilege of knowing some very remarkable people whose intelligence, generosity, and support sustained me through an occasionally difficult process. First, my doctoral advisor and friend Lisa Disch provided encouragement and guidance at each step of this project, which began with a conversation in a coffee shop in Minneapolis where Lisa convinced me that “this cyberspace thing” I had become so interested in...

read more

Introduction: The Politics of Visibility

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xxix

On 5 August 1993, convicted murderer Joseph Paul Jernigan was executed by lethal injection in Huntsville, Texas, leaving to scientific research, at his own request, the otherwise healthy corpse of a well-developed, thirtynine- year-old male who was free from the ravages of disease, age, and trauma. Technicians of the state anatomical board placed Jernigan’s body in one and a half gallons of one-percent formalin for temporary preservation and transported...

read more

1. Theorizing Spaces

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-34

According to American popular culture, human beings since at least the Stone Age have sought, often through technological achievements, to direct the course of their lives by reshaping the physical spaces around them. Though the quotation above overstates our ability to do that, it nonetheless offers an insight into the close, perhaps mutually causal, connection that...

read more

2. Democratic Utopias

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-74

Space and democracy correspond in ways that are neither unique nor incidental. This relationship is, in a sense, ordinary in that, as Michael Shapiro observes, “all forms of political theory that are comprehensive and totalizing presume elaborate spatial strategies” (1992, 4). It is also seemingly obligatory in that theories of democracy assume a form of government...

read more

3. Hardware and Software: A Techno-Topography of Cyberspace

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-106

Computers were feared as purveyors of disempowerment long before they became the stuff of revolutionary hopes and democratic dreams. Prior to the early 1980s, they remained very much a special-interest technology: a high-tech toy for nerds at various research institutes and, what was worse, a powerful tool in the hands of governmental and corporate giants.Where they were felt to have an impact on the lives of normal, everyday folks...

read more

4. Wetware: An Ethno-Topography of Cyberspace

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-140

In cyberspeak, computer users are often referred to as wetware—the organic, carbon-based component in the otherwise silicon and binary world of computing. Other common synonyms for the human element in computing include liveware and, of course, meatware (recalling the discussion in the introduction). Since water makes up between 50 and 90 percent of the weight...

read more

5. Hacking Cyberspace

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-198

As I argued in the previous chapter, following Foucault, apparatuses of security are one of the conditions of possibility for democracy as it has come to be practiced in the modern era, enabling the production of what Sandy Stone has called “the politically apprehensible citizen” (1996, 79). My topographies also revealed, however, that the physical, conceptual, and experiential spatiality...

read more

Conclusion: Cybertopia and the Demos

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-212

Spatial strategies are not incidental to politics. Indeed, creating safe havens through the erection of protective walls (beltways, the private realm, encryption fortresses) behind which the liberal individual can exercise his (occasionally also her) freedom has constituted a kind of fetish in liberal-democratic thought, in some instances overriding other concerns of arguably a more democratic nature. In direct, participatory forms of democracy...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-258

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-286

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 287-296

read more

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 297-297

Diana Saco is an interdisciplinary cultural, political, and international relations theorist. She has published in European Journal of International Relations...