Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface: Toward Critical Security Studies

MICHAEL C. WILLIAMS, KEITH KRAUSE

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pp. vii-xxii

This book emerged out of a desire to contribute to the development of a self-consciously critical perspective within security studies. Intellectually, the rationale for this is straightforward: security studies (however broadly defined) has been among the last bastions of orthodoxy in International Relations to accept critical or theoretically sophisticated challenges...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xxiii-xxiii

This volume, and the conference that preceded it, could not have come about without intellectual and practical contributions from a wide range of people. The initial ideas were developed at the York Centre for International and Strategic Studies (YCISS) in Toronto, where for many years students and faculty have been working in an extremely congenial...

PART I: Conceptual Debates and Approaches

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1. Contesting an Essential Concept: Reading the Dilemmas in Contemporary Security Discourse

SIMON DALBY

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pp. 3-32

The Cold War is over, we are told, but even a casual reading and viewing of dominant Western media suggest that threats to security continue to proliferate. In the academy and in foreign-policy journals new threats are analyzed and new dangers assessed. The catalog of dangers requiring..

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2. From Strategy to Security: Foundations of Critical Security Studies

KEITH KRAUSE, MICHAEL C. WILLIAMS

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pp. 33-60

The nature of security has become one of the most widely discussed elements in the intellectual ferment that has been triggered by the end of the Cold War. Optimists have declared that the end of the century is ushering in a new era of peace and cooperation, based variously on liberal democracy, transnational capitalism, international organizations, or a combination of the above.1 The more pessimistic offer warnings of an anarchic...

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3. The Subject of Security

R. B. J. WALKER

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pp. 61-82

What are the conditions under which it is now possible to think, speak, and make authoritative claims about what is referred to in the language of modern politics as "security"? This is the crucial question that must be addressed, given the widely shared sense that we hardly know what we are talking about when this term rolls so easily off the tongue to circulate..

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4. Security and Self: Reflections of a Fallen Realist

KEN BOOTH

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pp. 83-120

What is being discussed in this book and this chapter is no trivial matter. It begins in a debate in which there is agreement that security is crucial, but disagreement about what security is and how it should be studied. This debate within security studies over the past few years is now largely polarizing between the post-Cold War updaters of established strategic studies and the proponents of what is now labeled—as a result...

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5. Defining Security: A Subaltern Realist Perspective

MOHAMMED AYOOB

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pp. 121-146

Recent attempts at broadening the definition of the concept of security beyond its traditional realist usage have created a major dilemma for students of International Relations. On the one hand, it is clear that the traditional definition of security that has dominated the Western literature on the subject is inadequate to explain the multifaceted and multidimensional...

PART II: The Discourses of Security

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6. Discourses of War: Security and the Case of Yugoslavia

BEVERLY CRAWFORD, RONNIE D. LIPSCHUT

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pp. 149-186

The agonizing war in the former Yugoslavia, the interminable parlays about what to do, the innumerable threats made and peace plans offered, retracted, and made again have all served to highlight the process by which Western decision-making elites have tried to redefine their own, and their countries', security in the post-Cold War world. To the question...

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7. Reimagining Security: The Metaphors of Proliferation

DAVID MUTIMER

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pp. 187-222

For forty-five years the confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union has defined the theory and practice of international security. We lived, it was assumed, in a bipolar world, with one pole in Washington and the other in Moscow. These poles oriented our thinking about security, not only between the superpowers or even in Europe, but...

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8. Changing Worlds of Security

KARIN M. FIERKE

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pp. 223-252

In recent years scholars of International Relations have been preoccupied with redefining security, which implies that the meaning of this concept as used in the Cold War context has changed.1 The purpose of this article is to return to the rough ground of the everyday language of the Cold War and its aftermath to trace the changes that gave rise to these definitional questions on the part of scholars. The task is not to ask..

PART III: World Order and Regional Imperatives

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9. Between a New World Order and None: Explaining the Reemergence of the United Nations in World Politics

THOMAS RISSE-KAPPEN

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pp. 255-298

This chapter has two purposes, one theoretical, the other empirical.1 First, I try to show that the divide between mainstream International Relations theory and so-called critical approaches is not as deep as many authors, including some in this book, assume. In particular, I argue that competing hypotheses can be derived from sophisticated rationalist approaches...

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10. The Periphery as the Core: The Third World and Security Studies

AMITAV ACHARYA

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pp. 299-328

The primary concern of this volume is to examine how the discourses and practices of security might have changed or be changing from the dominant understanding of the concept. What constitutes this dominant understanding is perhaps easily recognized. It is a notion of security rooted firmly within the realist tradition, or what Ken Booth has termed...

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11. Critical Security Studies and Regional Insecurity: The Case of Southern Africa

KEN BOOTH AND PETER VALE

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pp. 329-358

If critical security studies are to flourish and lead to a revisioning of security in world politics, it is necessary that they challenge traditional security studies not only at the theoretical level—where a start has already been made—but also at the empirical level in terms of dealing with what is usually called the real world. Southern Africa is a particularly interesting case with which to test the engagement of critical security studies...

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12. Conclusion: Every Month Is "Security Awareness Month"

BRADLEY S. KLEIN

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pp. 359-368

The official magazine of the U.S. Department of State, appropriately— if unimaginatively—titled State, announces by way of a cover story that January 1995 is "Security Awareness Month."1 No small pronouncement, this is, in a post-Cold War world characterized by dozens of regional conflicts, serious threats against human rights, global warming, the worldwide migration of plagues and epidemics, the instability...

Contributors

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pp. 369-372

Index

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pp. 373-379