Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Part I. Introduction

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1 Putting "Race" in Its Place

Michael Peter Smith, Joe R. Feagin

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pp. 3-28

Why is "race" a central source of meaning, identity, and power in U.S. society? How does the way we talk about racial difference articulate with the interplay of power and knowledge in the structuring of class, gender, and ethnic relations in contemporary society? ...

Part II. The Social Construction of Racial and Ethnic Difference

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2 Dictatorship, Democracy, and Difference: The Historical Construction of Racial Identity

Howard Winant

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pp. 31-49

A quarter-century after the peak of the civil rights movement, the theme of race continues to occupy a central place in U.S. cultural, political, and economic life. But what does race mean in the United States today? How can a concept with no scientific significance, a concept that is understood in such varied and often irrational ways, retain such force? ...

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3. Who Are the "Good Guys"? The Social Construction of the Vietnamese "Other"

Michael Peter Smith, Bernadette Tarallo

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pp. 50-76

At 1:30 in the afternoon on April 4, 1991, four Asian American youths entered a Good Guys electronic store located in the Florin Center Shopping Mall in south Sacramento, California. The young men, who were armed, held forty-one people hostage, negotiating with the Sacramento County Sheriff's Department for, among other demands, passage out of the country to enable them to fight Communists in Southeast Asia. ...

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4. The Rising Significance of Status in U.S. Race Relations

Martín Sánchez Jankowski

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pp. 77-98

The field of race relations in the United States has been dominated by two conceptual frameworks. The first views race relations as involving African Americans and whites. A vast literature has developed that insists on a black-versus-white paradigm. ...

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5. African American Entrepreneurship and Racial Discrimination: A Southern Metropolitan Case

Michael Hodge, Joe R. Feagin

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pp. 99-120

Ethnic entrepreneur-ship has become a major topic for research among social scientists in a number of different disciplines. Central to this research is the argument that ownership of small businesses is a major avenue of social and economic mobility for immigrant Americans and for Americans in historically oppressed groups. ...

Part III. Race, Segregation, and the State

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6. Black Ghettoization and Social Mobility

Norman Fainstein

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pp. 123-141

Some images about race confront us every day when we turn on our television sets: teenage mothers on welfare, crack addicts, drive-by shootings, rundown neighborhoods, children dying in tenement-house fires, the MTV rap world of fast girls and violent boys. ...

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7. Historical Footprints: The Legacy of the School Desegregation Pioneers

Leslie Baham Inniss

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pp. 142-162

Almost forty years after the Supreme Court struck down "separate but equal" schools, we are now witnessing a trend away from the original school desegregation process and toward implicit and explicit resegregation in America's school systems. In many cities "a substantial proportion of black pupils continue to attend segregated (and unequal) schools."1 ...

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8. Retreat from Equal Opportunity? The Case of Affirmative Action

Cedric Herring, Sharon M. Collins

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pp. 163-181

Affirmative action policies have generated widespread opposition among Americans. Results from a 1991 New York Times—CBS News poll reveal that only 28 percent of Americans "believe that where there has been job discrimination against women in the past, preference in hiring should be given to women today."1 ...

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9. Demobilization in the New Black Political Regime: Ideological Capitulation and Radical Failure in the Postsegregation Era

Adolph Reed Jr.

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pp. 182-208

It is ironic that the exponential increases in black public-office holding since the 1970s have been accompanied by a deterioration of the material circumstances of large segments of the black citizenry. Comment on that irony comes both from those on the Left who underscore the insufficiency of capturing public office ...

Part IV. Globalization and the New Boundaries of Race and Ethnicity

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10. The Real "New World Order": The Globalization of Racial and Ethnic Relations in the Late Twentieth Century

Néstor P. Rodríguez

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pp. 211-225

The late twentieth century has witnessed an increasing globalization of racial and ethnic relations in the United States. Since the mid-1960s, world developments, transnational migration, and the emergence of binational immigrant communities have significantly affected the character of intergroup relations in U.S. society. ...

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11. The Effects of Transnational Culture, Economy, and Migration on Mixtec Identity in Oaxacalifornia

Michael Kearney

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pp. 226-243

One of the prototypical social identities of anthropology is "the peasant," denned as a small agriculturist making autonomous decisions about production primarily for autoconsumption.1 In the classic images of peasants they live in small "rural" communities and are bearers of "traditional" culture. ...

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12. Models of Immigrant Integration in France and the United States: Signs of Convergence?

Sophie Body-Gendrot

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pp. 244-262

Two great "models" of social integration are usually put forward when comparing the United States and France.1 These relate to the historical principles setting social integration in action in both nations, to conceptions of immigration, to perspectives on international relations, and to the centrality of race in the United States. ...

Part V. Race, Ethnicity, and Community Power

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13. When the Melting Pot Boils Over: The Irish, Jews, Blacks, and Koreans of New York

Roger Waldinger

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pp. 265-281

Assimilation is the grand theme of American immigration research. The classic sociological position provided an optimistic counter to the dim assessments of the new immigrants prevalent at the early part of the century. Notwithstanding the marked differences that impressed contemporaries, Robert Park, Ernest Burgess, W. I. Thomas, and others ...

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14. Beyond "Politics by Other Means"? Empowerment Strategies for Los Angeles' Asian Pacific Community

Harold Brackman, Steven P. Erie

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pp. 282-303

Asian Pacific politics has been characterized as "politics by other means," for example, indirect influence through interest group lobbying, targeted campaign contributions, litigation, and protest rather than through the traditional direct electoral routes of voting and officeholding. ...

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15. Political Capital and the Social Reproduction of Inequality in a Mexican Origin Community in Arizona

Edward Murguia

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pp. 304-322

In this study, we will examine theories concerned with the social reproduction of inequality in education and occupation, and will determine their applicability to the situation of a Mexican origin community in Arizona. Using Bourdieu's ([1973] 1977) theory of cultural capital and theories of labor market segmentation by Piore ([1970] 1977), ...

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16. The Continuing Legacy of Discrimination in Southern Communities

James W. Button

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pp. 323-338

The civil rights movement of the 1960s was considered one of the most important social movements in this country's history. With a particular focus on the South, whose history of antiblack violence and segregation was unparalleled, the movement's primary goals included political power and social and economic equality for blacks. ...

Contributors

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pp. 339-344

Index

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pp. 345-359