Cover

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About the Series, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This book started with a conference on security and migration held in Chiang Rai, Thailand, in December 2004. The conference was part of the Asia–Europe Workshop series organized jointly by the Department of Geography, National University of Singapore; Sciences-Po in Paris; the Centre for European Studies, Chulalongkorn University; ...

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Introduction

Prem Kumar Rajaram, Carl Grundy-Warr

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pp. ix-xl

We want to emphasize that the study of borders and migration centers on questions of justice and its limits. The border is not a neutral line of separation; borders between nation-states demarcate belonging and nonbelonging and authorize a distinction between norm and exception. ...

Part I: Knowledge, Power, Surveillance

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1. Detention of Foreigners, States of Exception, and the Social Practices of Control of the Banopticon

Didier Bigo

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pp. 3-34

The hypothesis underlying this chapter is that the detention of foreigners is related to a specific form of governmentality: the banopticon. The banopticon may be considered a dispositif: the detention of foreigners considered “would-be criminals” in camps is, for the present time, the locus that concentrates and articulates heterogeneous lines of power diffracted into society. ...

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2. Struggling with (Il)Legality: The Indeterminate Functioning of Malaysia’s Borders for Asylum Seekers, Refugees, and Stateless Persons

Alice M. Nah

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pp. 35-64

For asylum seekers, refugees, and stateless persons in Malaysia, there are no clearly demarcated temporal or spatial limits to Malaysia’s borders. Malaysia, along with their anxiety-filled relationship to it, does not begin and end until the time they permanently leave the country. ...

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3. The Foreigner in the Security Continuum: Judicial Resistance in the United Kingdom

Elspeth Guild

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pp. 65-90

In examining the development of the practice and theory of surveillance at distance, Didier Bigo finds a transnational field of security where internal and external security become a continuum in which the worlds of the police and military find themselves in competition (Bigo 2005, 129–60). ...

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4. Ambivalent Categories: Hill Tribes and Illegal Migrants in Thailand

Mika Toyota

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pp. 91-116

The border is not a neutral line of separation; borders not only demarcate boundaries between nation-states, they also make the distinction between belonging and nonbelonging to the state. Most works on territorialization look at the border in relation to international boundaries, ...

Part II: Borderpanic: Representing Migrants and Borders

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5. Danger Happens at the Border

Emma Haddad

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pp. 119-136

The border can be understood as a dangerous place. Things that cross the border undermine the border’s authority and have the capacity to “pollute” the inside that the border is trying to protect. To highlight this understanding of pollution, this chapter uses the concept of the refugee as one moving individual who operates at the border. ...

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6. Violence, Subversion, and Creativity in the Thai–Malaysian Borderland

Alexander Horstmann

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pp. 137-158

When the military arrived in a village in Narathiwat province in the week ending September 25, 2005, only women and children remained, holding a banner and saying: “You are the terrorist.” ...

Part III: Rethinking Borderscapes: Mapping Hidden Geographies

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7. The Poetry of Boundaries

James D. Sidaway

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pp. 161-182

Reflecting life and journeys along the Portuguese–Spanish borderlands, this is a chapter of detours and departures. Rather like the quotes above, it is a collection of fragments of the border —thoughts and reflections on the boundary stones and rivers, the maps and marks that serve and signify this frontier. ...

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8. The Sites of the Sino–Burmese and Thai–Burmese Boundaries: Transpositions between the Conceptual and Life Worlds

Karin Dean

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pp. 183-200

The concept of a boundary cutting through naturally connected space has forged the division of world space into fixed, sovereign units —both on the tangible political maps and in the less palpable but pervasive practices of international relations. The borders separating territories and people are subject to complex dynamics stemming from countless and imminently contradicting state, global, and local factors. ...

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9. A Pacific Zone? (In)Security, Sovereignty, and Stories of the Pacific Borderscape

Suvendrini Perera

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pp. 201-228

On November 4, 2003, the day of the Melbourne Cup, the most significant sporting event in Australia (“the race that stops a nation”), a fishing boat, the Minasa Bone, landed on Melville Island, about twenty kilometers off the northern capital of Darwin. The Islanders, Indigenous Tiwi people, were surprised to come across obviously foreign men on the beach who asked them, “Is this Australia?” ...

Part IV: Rethinking Borderscapes: The New Political

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10. “Temporary Shelter Areas” and the Paradox of Perceptibility: Imperceptible Naked-Karens in the Thai–Burmese Border Zones

Decha Tangseefa

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pp. 231-262

The fate and struggles of forcibly displaced peoples1 from the Burmese nation-state along Thailand’s “door” can be articulated in the spirit of Franz Kafka’s “Before the Law”:2 ...

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11. Locating Political Space through Time: Asylum and Excision in Australia

Prem Kumar Rajaram

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pp. 263-282

On November 4, 2003, the vessel Minasa Bone landed without authorization on Australia’s Melville Island, some twenty kilometers off Darwin. On board were ten male Kurdish individuals plus four Indonesian crew. The boat had arrived from Indonesia; the passengers on board were Turkish nationals. ...

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12. Border’s Capture: Insurrectional Politics, Border-Crossing Humans, and the New Political

Nevzat Soguk

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pp. 283-308

Borders have lives of their own. They move, shift, metamorphose, edge, retract, emerge tall and powerful or retreat into the shadows exhausted, or even grow irrelevant. They are not simply fences, walls, and chains that divide the earth’s surface into sovereign territories, simple in purpose and function as they appear on a world map. ...

Contributors

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pp. 309-314

Index

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pp. 315-330