Cover

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Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

In producing Bodies and Disciplines: Intersections of Literature and History in Fifteenth-Century England, the editors extend their thanks to a number of people and academic units that made both the initial conference possible and the subsequent volume a reality. ...

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xii

The metaphor of "intersections" or crossroads as a model of interdisciplinary work boldly offers itself to humorous critique (an offer generously accepted by the first and last essays in this volume): unfortunate things can happen at intersections. This metaphor does, however, represent measurable progress over the introduction to the Center for Medieval Studies' predecessor volume, ...

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1. Brewing Trouble: On Literature and History—and Alewives

Ralph Hanna III

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pp. 1-18

This essay places both its author and his subjects in a position of danger. For whatever the synergies "intersections" may provide, there are concomitant dangers — collisions and accidents, often of the mortal variety. Surveys always show, for example, that more pileups occur at the junctures of southern California freeways than occur in all the other miles they traverse. ...

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2. The Body, Whole and Vulnerable, in Fifteenth-Century England

Miri Rubin

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pp. 19-28

As so many inherited grounding categories of historical explanation have been moved by the winds of plurality and difference, sweet winds whose effect has been welcome and fresh, historians and literary critics have returned to the body as a secure site of certainty and truth, as a grounding place for that which might connect people across their many differences.1 ...

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3. "Representyd now in yower syght": The Culture of Spectatorship in Late-Fifteenth-Century England

Seth Lerer

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pp. 29-62

Sometime during the mid-1470s, the corporation of the town of Lydd, in Kent, commissioned the transcription of their Customall, or custom book, the codified account of legal and community practices drawn from the inheritance of English customary law. ...

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4. Ritual, Theater, and Social Space in the York Corpus Christi Cycle

Sarah Beckwith

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pp. 63-86

Christianity provides in the condensed symbolic economy of the passion an image of the body that converts the suffering of one individual into the redemption of the world.1 In the passion and resurrection sequences of the York Corpus Christi cycle, that symbol that clerical culture had sought to establish as hegemonic (universal, yet exclusive to them through their rights of mediation and officiation) ...

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5. Finding Language for Misconduct: Jurors in Fifteenth-Century Local Courts

Marjorie K. Mclntosh

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pp. 87-122

During the fifteenth century, the heads of established families in many English market towns and villages expressed growing concern with certain forms of social misconduct. Some actions appeared to local leaders to threaten the social peace and concord of their communities; issues like malicious gossip and eavesdropping were particularly troublesome during the first half of the century. ...

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6. Two Models, Two Standards: Moral Teaching and Sexual Mores

Ruth Mazo Karras

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pp. 123-138

During the Middle Ages, although a clearly articulated set of official teachings stipulated what sexual behavior was permitted and what was forbidden, not everyone followed it. In addition, even if standards of sexual morality were the same for both sexes, men could much more easily flout them without risking punishment or opprobrium. ...

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7. Blessing from Sun and Moon: Churching as Women's Theater

Gail McMurray Gibson

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pp. 139-154

After her miraculous and inviolate childbirth, the Virgin Mary remained at the Bethlehem manger for forty days: thus did the Meditationes vitae Christi instruct the unnamed nun (a Poor Clare) for whom the famously influential devotional text was first penned in the latter part of the thirteenth century. ...

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8. "The Childe of Bristowe" and the Making of Middle-Class Adolescence

Barbara A. Hanawalt

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pp. 155-178

The behavior of middle-class youth came to prominence in the literature, laws, court cases, guild regulations, and thinking of fifteenth- century English society in an obsessive way uncharacteristic of preceding centuries.1 Books of advice for youth aspiring to make their way up the social ladder proliferated in manuscript form and spread even more with the invention of printing. ...

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9. Reciprocity and Exchange in the Late Medieval Household

Felicity Heal

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pp. 179-198

The great household in late medieval England was the principal focus not only of elite consumption but also of social exchange. Noble households modeled themselves upon the greatest establishment of all, the royal court—that "new house of houses principal of England/' as the Black Book of Edward IV called it. ...

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10. William Thorpe and His Lollard Community: Intellectual Labor and the Representation of Dissent

Rita Copeland

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pp. 199-222

This chapter explores how a politically persuasive model of dissenting identity is produced through an intersection of historical and literary representations. It considers the role of professional intellectuals as articulate participants in social resistance, and how, as intellectuals, they can occupy the problematic space that official legal structures make for self-representation among dissenters. ...

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Afterword: What Happens at Intersections?

Paul Strohm

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pp. 223-232

Ralph Hanna is right about our common contemporary experience when he describes intersections as places of collision and danger. An alternative understanding—congenial to the centuries covered by this volume even if only latently available today—would treat the intersection as a carrefour: a crossroad or market square, ...

Contributors

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pp. 233-234

Index

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pp. 235-242