Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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p. v

List of Manuscripts

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

This book is in part a synthesis of the very different theoretical approaches and critical concerns of the members of my remarkable Ph.D. dissertation committee at Northwestern University: Albert R. Ascoli, John Dagenais, and William D. Paden. I could not have conceived...

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1. Assembling the Book and Its Author: A Historical Overview

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pp. 1-24

In the thirteenth century, western Europe witnessed a sharp increase in vernacular literacy and the widespread appearance, for the first time since classical antiquity, of a large body of secular literature for popular consumption.1 Some of the earliest surviving manuscripts...

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2. Uc de Saint Circ

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pp. 25-46

In order to understand the emergence in Italy of lyric cycles and codices ordered by their authors, I would like to investigate as a point of departure the role played by the author in an earlier Occitan anthology compiled presumably by scribes. The latter part...

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3. Guittone d’Arezzo

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pp. 47-69

In passing from the Occitan troubadour Uc de Saint Circ to the Italian poet Guittone d’Arezzo, we find ourselves on firmer ground. Italian poetry was born under the sign of Latinity, and of writing; there is little evidence of its oral transmission or musical performance...

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4. “De’ varie romanze volgare”

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pp. 70-100

When Guittone d’Arezzo ordered his individual poems into a longer macrotext, strung his pearls into a necklace, he set a precedent. There is a good deal of evidence in the canzoniere Vaticano Latino 3793 (ms. V)—the largest and most...

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5. Guiraut Riquier

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pp. 101-119

Let us temporarily abandon the thriving literary culture of Florence and neighboring cities and make a geographic leap back northward and westward to examine the work of a troubadour who frequently took as his subject matter the decline of Occitan...

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6. Dante’s “Vita nova”

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pp. 120-144

The libello of young Dante Alighieri, composed in the last decade of the thirteenth century, has much in common with Guiraut Riquier’s nearly contemporary “libre,” especially in its deliberate self-positioning in relation to previous tradition...

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7. Nicolò de’ Rossi

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pp. 145-169

One hundred years after Uc de Saint Circ’s residence in the court of Alberico da Romano, we find ourselves back in Treviso, in the hands of another great anthologizer. The Treviso-born Nicolò de’ Rossi, elected professor of law in 1318 in...

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8. Petrarch’s “Canzoniere”

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pp. 170-180

When, in the second half of the fourteenth century, Francesco Petrarca assembled the work to which he gave the Latin title Rerum vulgarium fragmenta—and to which I refer by its more informal (and much later) vernacular name, the...

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Conclusion

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pp. 181-185

According to Leonard Barkan, “It could be argued that all of Petrarch’s works amount to an extended act of introspection and autobiography,” and “Petrarch’s works probably represent the first sustained attempt at self-consciousness in Western...

Notes

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pp. 187-222

Bibliography

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pp. 223-236

Index

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pp. 237-245

About the Author

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p. 246