Cover

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Title, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction: Encounters of the Culinary and the Avant-Garde

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pp. vii-xxxviii

This book arose initially out of a stupor provoked by Franz Kafka’s enigmatic intricacy of unsuspecting metamorphoses and disturbing visions. Three of his short stories spurred my thinking about the connections or, as I would like to call them, interferences between the two fields investigated here: avant-garde studies and the culinary field.1 ...

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One: Futurist Banquets

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pp. 1-52

No matter where we turn in our consumer society today, we are flooded with information about the body’s physical and mental health. Radio and television programs, magazines and specialized books, cookery texts, advertisements and commercials all entice the public to purchase more and more information on how to consume less. ...

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Two: Antimeals of Antiart: Dada-Diets

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pp. 53-90

The use of incorporation and digestion in selected Dada texts and manifestos was a rhetorical approach to food detectable in the texts written by the forerunners of the surrealists. This group of Dada artists and poets, primarily associated with Zurich and Paris but also with Berlin and Cologne, ...

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Three: Walter Benjamin’s Gastro-Constellations

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pp. 91-144

There are no easy ways around Walter Benjamin’s writings. Yet the intricacy of his thought opens up multiple points of entry into his corpus, which, as the critic Gerhard Richter argues, never advances concepts readily available for everyday use.1 ...

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Four: Daniel Spoerri’s Gastronoptikum

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pp. 145-208

Daniel Spoerri inaugurated Eat Art in Düsseldorf with the Spoerri Restaurant (1968) and the Eat Art Gallery (1970).1 Eat Art does not illustrate but actualizes the flows of energy and multiple temporalities passing from the singular eating body to the collective body. ...

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Five: Convivia of the Neo-Avant-Garde

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pp. 209-256

This final chapter considers two groupings of artists who worked with food. I first analyze neo-avant-garde collaborators in Spoerri’s Eat Art project, namely, those artists who exhibited at Eat Art Gallery and, in certain cases, also cooked at his restaurant. ...

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Conclusion: In/Edible Art: What Remains?

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pp. 257-270

This book has traced the aesthetic interrelations between the classical movements of the avant-garde at the beginning of the twentieth century and the neo-avant-garde between the sixties and eighties. It has examined how critical attention to the presence of food in the avant-garde (first in metaphoric form and later in material form) ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 271-274

Many institutions and people contributed to the making of this book. Certain chapters were originally conceived for my thesis at the University of Chicago, and I owe a first debt to my adviser, Katie Trumpener, who always went out of her way to assist and encourage me. ...

Notes

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pp. 275-312

Index

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pp. 313-350