Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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p. v

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

Serendipity launched 194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front in 1996, but events have overtaken it, dragging it into the twenty-first century. In the process of researching and writing this book, a cultural industry has grown up around World War II that parallels the American interest in the Civil War. Not...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

I have often felt a strong wind at my back, from supportive mentors and colleagues, both in and outside art history: At Haverford and Bryn Mawr Colleges, Barbara Miller Lane, Ellen Stroud, Roger Lane, Carol Hager, Jeff Cohen, and Dan Gillis. At Princeton, Patricia Brown, Dorothea Dietrich, Ted...

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Introduction: Planning the Postwar Architect

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pp. 1-14

This is a book about planning, specifically the culture surrounding planning during World War II in the United States and particularly its intersection with architecture and consumer culture. Actual master plans play a negligible role, as do buildings. Rather, it is a cultural history of home...

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1. The Culture of Planning: The Rhetoric and Imagery of Home Front Anticipation

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pp. 15-58

Architects embraced planning in the cultural context of the home front, when New Deal, wartime, and postwar planning overlapped. These three forms of planning gave the moment its rhetorical and visual character, filtering widely into American culture and tilting Americans toward the future. The culture...

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2. Old Cities, New Frontiers: Mature Economy Theory and the Language of Renewal

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pp. 59-95

The culture of planning prepared Americans in word and image for what seemed like an inevitable national venture into urban reconstruction after the war. Partisans of planning saw the renewal of cities in far-reaching terms as a transformation of culture and identity in light of the social, economic...

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3. Advertising Nothing, Anticipating Nowhere: Architects and Consumer Culture

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pp. 96-158

194X might be seen as a temporal frontier in which the rhetoric of maturity narrated a tale of destruction and the possibility of a new world after the war. While the metaphor of maturity prepared a postwar tabula rasa, advertisements in the building industry filled it in. Architects, who had...

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4. The End of Planning: The Building Boom and the Invention of Normalcy

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pp. 159-195

“Are you Doodling or Planning for that Building Boom?” Time magazine posed the question to readers of Architectural Forum and other magazines in April 1943 as part of a new series of advertisements that threw much of the culture of planning into question (Figure 4.1).1 The building...

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Afterword

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pp. 196-198

Planning, the vivid word used to narrate the world of 194X, today may well seem to be a dead word, or at least dated, representing a failed mission. But I believe this mission rests dormant in American culture, awaiting the right conditions to reassert itself. Planning emerged as a specialized field...

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Appendix: Wartime Advertising Campaigns

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pp. 199-207

This appendix lists many of the advertising campaigns in which architects or industrial designers presented their designs. I endeavored to include every advertisement in each series. Because of the inconsistency of binding practices, the bound volumes of magazines do not always retain...

Notes

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pp. 209-231

Bibliography

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pp. 233-244

Index

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pp. 245-254

About the Author

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p. 255

Image Plates

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pp. 257-268