Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-x

THIS book is an informal critical account of Irish dramatic writing since about 1926 when Sean O'Casey cried with savagery and sadness, "Inishfallen, Fare Thee Well," and followed Shaw and Joyce and so many other Wild Geese into...

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

I: THE REALISTIC DRAMA OF THE ABBEY

read more

1 The Abbey: Shadow or Substance of a Theatre?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-20

The old fire-gutted building in Abbey Street has been at last razed. A handsome, splendidly equipped new theatre has been constructed on the site, and the Abbey, after its fifteen year exile at the Queen's Theatre in Pearse Street, has finally...

read more

2 The Abbey Dramatists: 1926–1945

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-51

THE first twenty years after O'Casey's departure are usually considered barren ones for the Abbey; a favorite amusement of the Dublin literati has been to revile the poverty of the company's repertoire. The witty savagery of this continuing...

read more

3 Paul Vincent Carroll: The Rebel as Prodigal Son

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-63

"I'm as Irish as a terrier and with as sharp a bite," Paul Vincent Carroll once wrote, and that is a fair description of the best known and most personally dynamic Irish playwright to appear between O'Casey and Behan. Still, it is not the whole description; it...

read more

4 The Abbey Dramatists: 1946–1965

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 64-85

JUDGING writers still in their prime or just reaching it is an uncertain task at best. It seems safe to say, however, that in its last twenty years the Abbey has encouraged four exceptional talents — Walter Macken, Bryan MacMahon, Seamus...

read more

5 Michael Molloy's Dying Ireland

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-98

WHEN Michael J. Molloy's The King of Friday's Men was staged at the Abbey Theatre in October, 1948, many Irish critics hailed him as a second Synge. Their enthusiasm has since cooled, for Molloy is a slow writer,...

read more

Appendix I: Tomelty, Thompson, and the Theatre in Ulster

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-108

BEFORE the twentieth century, Ulster had really no native drama, although a good handful of playwrights, among them Farquhar and Macklin, had come from there. At the beginning of this century, a native drama did take root, but its...

II: REACTIONS FROM REALISM

read more

6 At the Gate Theatre

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 111-132

ALTHOUGH the modern Irish drama originated partly in a nationalist impulse, there were other allied impulses even from the beginning. Yeats, of course, was the champion of a poetic drama which in a few early plays was allied with...

read more

7 The Adult Theatre of Denis Johnston

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-146

I'T IS necessary to correct a widespread impression, put about by unscrupulous enemies, that I died of some unspecified disease in the summer of 1933, and have never written anything since." So writes, with engaging wryness, Denis Johnston in a preface to...

read more

8 The Experimental Theatre of the Poets

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-163

THERE is a vast mass of criticism that analyzes and appreciates the plays of W. B. Yeats, and I do not propose to add appreciably to it. It would seem an impertinent casualness to sum up in a few pages the dozen plays which Yeats wrote...

read more

Appendix II: The Genius of George Fitzmaurice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 164-175

WHEN George Fitzmaurice died in 1963, he was given only a couple of short paragraphs in the Irish Times, which remembered him mainly as the author of The Country Dressmaker and a few one-acts performed early in...

III: THE POST-WAR SYNTHESIS

read more

9 The Theatre Festival

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-197

THE Dublin Theatre Festival has received considerable criticism, but when we consider how the Abbey is still reorganizing itself, how the Gate is almost defunct, and how the Globe and the Pike have disappeared, then it seems clear that the...

read more

10 The Short Happy World of Brendan Behan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 198-207

BRENDAN BEHAN will not lack biographers. From his drunken appearance on B.B.C. television in 1956 until his 'death in 1964, he lived his life in the public eye. He made better newspaper copy than any poet since Dylan Thomas whom, in...

read more

11 The Hidden Ireland of John B. Keane

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 208-220

Even though the comment was meant to be satirical, probably Keane appears that way to Dubliners. He is a Kerryman and easily the most popular Irish dramatist of the last five years. His popularity with audiences, though, does not impress the Irish critics, who praise him...

read more

Appendix III: The Outsiders

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-231

"OUTSIDERS" sounds like a term of faint or no praise. By it I mean only that the writers discussed here have stood a bit outside the literary and theatrical establishments. They have not been notably connected with a particular theatre....

IV: THE OLD MAN SAYS "YES!"

read more

12 In Sean O'Casey's Golden Days

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-252

IT IS a quaint irony that the commanding figure in the Irish drama of the last forty years has been Sean O'Casey, for the man hardly set foot in the country during all that time. He did, from his nest in Devon, send a steady stream of crusty advice and...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-258

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-271

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 272-282

Illustrations between pages 4 and 5

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 283-290