Cover

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Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

Portions of this book have been previously published elsewhere. Some paragraphs on performativity and ideographs from Chapter 1 and the analysis of same-sex marriage debates from Chapter 2 appeared in "Queering Marriage: An Ideographic Interrogation of Heteronormative Subjectivity," ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-19

Non-heterosexual citizens' experiences, both personal and political, are influenced greatly by various and conflicting concepts of sexual identity. Such concepts of identity do not appear fully formed in public consciousness, but, rather, as Smith and Windes have observed, ''Identity is forged in combat" ("Identity" 29). ...

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1. The Rhetorical Secret

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pp. 20-57

In The History of Sexuality, Foucault writes, "We must not forget that the psychological, psychiatric, medical category of homosexuality was constituted from the moment it was characterized—Westphal's famous article of 1870 on 'contrary sexual sensations' can stand as its date of birth" (43). ...

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2. The Essential and the Ethnic

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pp. 58-77

The social classification of "homosexual identity" is a performative act, constituting identity by naming itself in public discourse. I have argued previously that identity is also ideographic, the material of ideology. "Identity," as a performative ideograph, has taken on two dominant usages in contemporary lesbian and gay movements: the essential and the ethnic. ...

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3. Semen and Subjectivity

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pp. 78-98

The story is shocking because the practices of "bug-chasing" and "barebacking" [deliberately having anal sex without a condom] seem incomprehensible after decades of HIV prevention and education.1 For other reasons, the story is quite conventional, almost predictable: the sexual practices of gay men are once again pathological; ...

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4. Experiencing the Erotic

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pp. 99-124

Over a decade ago, Frank Browning described gay life as a "culture of desire:' writing: "What began for me as a tour of the state of gay 'culture' under the profound stress of AIDS has, along the way, turned into an odyssey of personal and communal desire—desire not only in its limited physical sense, but desire for community, identity, and moral purpose" (9-10). ...

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5. Coming Out as Contagious Discourse

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pp. 125-150

Urvashi Vaid, the former executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, claims, "[A]ll the gains we've made derive from the fact that more of us live out of the closet today" ("After Identity" 28). These words betray the significance of secrets, their rhetorical force, their capacity to oppress, and their capacity to liberate. ...

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Conclusion: The Conditions of Speaking about Homosexuality

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pp. 151-156

The critical rhetoric project, taking material discourse as its object, reassesses the role of history within the critical act. Of course, any critical engagement with a rhetorical object is incomplete without some understanding of its historicity, for as Celeste Condit concludes, "The uniquely powerful province of rhetoric [is a] judgment of the collective human meaning-making process ...

Notes

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pp. 157-170

References

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pp. 171-190

Index

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pp. 191-194