Cover

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Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

List of Tables

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pp. xi-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

This book has been a challenge to write on several levels. I would first like to thank those who provided so much encouragement and support over the past ten years during the many ups and downs of the research and writing process. ...

A Note about Translations

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pp. xvii-xviii

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Introduction

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pp. xix-xxxiv

Hope's promise could be found in a remote corner of a remote community of an emerging evangelical world along the southern frontier. Hope, the settlement, was tucked among the hills of Piedmont North Carolina. Its founders—tobacco farmers and fishermen from Maryland—selected the site in 1772, partly for its promise as a farming community. ...

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Part One. Coming Together: Creating an Anglo-German World

In the backwoods of colonial North Carolina, the brethren cobbled together a cohesive community out of many disparate parts. Their glue was an evangelical religion centered on the new birth. The brethrens' task of forging a Moravian identity actually began years earlier, in places as disparate as Carrollton Manor, Maryland, and Broadbay, Maine. ...

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1. Prelude: The Northern Years

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pp. 3-34

The Peddycoards' journey to heart religion began not in a pew but behind a plow. Nathan Peddycoard moved his family to Carrollton Manor, Maryland, in the early 1750s from Prince George's County, where he had run a tavern. Religion, however, did not draw the Peddycoards to Carrollton; ...

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2. A Community of Believers

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pp. 35-65

After a lifetime of searching, George Soelle believed he understood the answer to a mystery that Christians had been pondering for centuries: how to achieve eternal salvation. Open your heart to Jesus, Soelle told anyone who would listen, and he will come into your life. Soelle was hardly bashful about delivering this message of eternal life. ...

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3. An Anglo-German World

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pp. 66-100

Adam Elrod's final resting place was a grassy patch on a knoll not far from Muddy Creek. The land sloped gently and offered an inviting view of the woods and farms that bordered the thirty-eight acres on which Hope's meetinghouse and its God's Acre stood. ...

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Part Two. Growing Together: The World from Without

The brethrens' Anglo-German world, a complex melding of distinct cultures, never existed in isolation. Religion and the nature of Moravianism itself propelled the brethren to look outward at the very time they were looking inward, at the state of their hearts. ...

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4. Becoming "American": The Revolutionary Years

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pp. 103-135

On May 12, 1780, Charleston, South Carolina, fell to British forces, and the reverberations were soon felt all the way to Friedberg, North Carolina. The enemy's capture of this pivotal southern port sent American soldiers and civilians alike fleeing northward. News of the disaster, which included the surrender of fifty-five hundred American soldiers— ...

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5. Becoming "Southern": The Slaveholding Years

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pp. 136-170

The town of Salem stood on a hill in the center of Wachovia, its main buildings huddled around a central square. Built with energy and purpose from 1766 to 1772, the village had grown steadily in its early years until by 1822 it had finally overtaken Friedberg as the most populous settlement in Wachovia. Salem was thriving. ...

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6. The New World of the 1830s and Beyond

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pp. 171-204

George Frederic Bahnson arrived in Bethania after a "tedious" ride from Salem that tired not only him but his horse. His first impression of his new home was not a good one. "It is a tolerably large town for North Carolina," Bahnson recorded in his diary, "but contains only one house that may be called handsome by a lenient critic."1 ...

Notes

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pp. 205-238

Glossary

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pp. 239-240

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 241-256

Index

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pp. 257-266