Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. v

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Acknowledgments

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p. vii

Special thanks go to those who have supported this project over the years. Priscilla Freeman Jacobs thanks her family members Donna and Dean for reading the manuscript and offering good advice and Welton for doing without her as she worked on this project. Thank you to Priscilla’s mama, Mrs. Vera Freeman, for generously sharing her memories with us. And a special thanks to Patricia Barker Lerch for her time and patience. Patricia Barker...

Jacobs Family Tree

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p. viii

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Introduction

Patricia Barker Lerch

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pp. ix-xvi

This book presents memories of the life and times of Priscilla Freeman Jacobs, Waccamaw Siouan Indian, former chief and leader, preacher, wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, born and raised in southeastern North Carolina. Priscilla’s memories describe scenes of daily life familiar to people living along the coastal plain of the southeastern United States, especially those raised surrounded...

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1. Early Memories

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pp. 1-19

Priscilla Freeman Jacobs recalled: “I was born on October 27, 1940, at my grandfather Alec Patrick’s home, and they always said that the bedroom that I was born in was like ‘cross the line’—I was half in Columbus and half in Bladen County. Of course, back then we didn’t depend on doctors like they do now. We didn’t have doctors; a midwife did me. She passed away before I got to know her. . . . I remember...

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2. Eyewitness to History

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pp. 20-29

Priscilla Freeman Jacobs was just a child when the Indian community leaders went to Washington, D.C., in 1950 to get Congress to draft a bill that would give them federal recognition as an Indian tribe (Alexander 1950:39; Lerch 2004). A purpose of the trip was to attend the subcommittee hearing on H.R. 7155 and H.R. 7299. The Indian part of the delegation included Riley T. Freeman, W. J. Freeman...

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3. Marriage and Family

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pp. 30-45

In this chapter Priscilla speaks candidly about living away from the Indian community for the first time. No longer surrounded by Indian people and family, she faced the challenge of raising children and balancing family life and paid work outside the home. In the end, strong ties to her Indian family and community eventually drew her back home. The following text is Priscilla’s memory of those times. Welton and I...

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4. Indian Activism: From Princess to Chief

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pp. 46-60

On May 5, 1986, an article appeared in the Charlotte Observer in which Chief Priscilla Freeman Jacobs was described as “the least fearsome-looking Indian chief in the country.” As Priscilla Jacobs and Patricia Barker Lerch sat down to continue their discussion of her memories of her time as chief of the Waccamaw Siouan tribe, Patricia read the following from this article: She is a 45-year...

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5. Spiritual Life

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pp. 61-79

Priscilla Freeman Jacobs’s identity as Native American and Christian are central to her life. Just as Indian activism drove her to assume a leadership position within her community, her Christian faith led her to the role of pastor. In this chapter, Priscilla tells the story of her Christian life, beginning with her Baptist upbringing and ending with her pastoral role and leadership of her own church. I was brought up in New Hope Baptist Church, which you can see out the window of the Corner...

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Epilogue

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pp. 80-86

Reflections of Priscilla Freeman Jacobs I began this project hoping that the record of my memories of the history of our Waccamaw Siouan Indian tribe would be passed on to the younger generation because I felt that many of them probably knew very little of these things. I’d like to end the book reflecting on some of the traditions that are important to me. The church was...

Notes

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pp. 87-92

References Cited

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pp. 93-102

Index

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pp. 103-106