Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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p. xi

Ronald Berman and Scott Donaldson gave us expert advice about revising the essays in this book. Marc Singer helped prepare the manuscript. The staff at The University of Alabama Press expressed confidence and displayed patience throughout the development and production of the Unless otherwise noted, the illustrations in the essay by Anne Mar ...

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Introduction

Jackson R. Bryer, Ruth Prigozy, Milton R. Stern

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pp. 10-18

On May 20, 1940, in a plea well known to every scholar of American literature, Fitzgerald wrote to his editor, Maxwell Perkins, to ask about the possibility of a reprint of The Great Gatsby. He was desperately unsetded in prospects, family, finances, and even in residence-the return address was in care of the Phil Berg Agency while Fitzgerald was in a West Coast transit...

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1. "Blue as the Sky, Gentlemen": Fitzgerald's Princeton through The Prince

ANNE MARGARET DANIEL

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pp. 19-46

F. Scott Fitzgerald attended Princeton University from the fall of 1913 until the fall of 1917. During these years, an academic setting preparing young men for lives as New York financiers, Philadelphia lawyers, and Washington politicians became a community mobilizing for military service. The concept of a world remade by war recurs in nearly all ...

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2. Princeton, Pragmatism, and Fitzgerald's Sentimental Journey

EDWARD GILLIN

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pp. 47-62

"TO regard all things and principles of things as inconstant modes or fashions has more and more become the tendency of modern thought," Walter Pater remarked in his famous concluding chapter of The Renaissance (233). The temporal conditioning of such a world reduces experience to infinitesimal units, each of which "is limited by time, and ... ...

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3. The Catholic Romanticism of This Side of Paradise

WALTER RAUBICHECK

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pp. 63-74

In his biography of Fitzgerald, Andre Le Vot quotes the remarks of the archbishop of Baltimore when, in 1975, the author's remains were moved to St. Mary's Church cemetery in Rockville, Maryland: F. Scott Fitzgerald came out of the Maryland Catholic tradition. He was a man touched by the faith of the Catholic Church. There can be perceived in his works a Catholic consciousness of reality. He found in this...

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4. The Devil and F. Scott Fitzgerald

STEPHEN L. TANNER

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pp. 75-87

W hat is the devil doing in a novel like This Side of Paradise? This question underlies a good deal of diverse commentary on the novel. Some view "The Devil" section and the other apparently supernatural episodes as the products of an immature writer crowding random and undigested incidents into his first novel. Others explain these aspects as unsuccessful attempts...

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5. Youth Culture and the Spectacle of Waste: This Side of Paradise and The Beautiful and Damned

KIRK CURNUTT

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pp. 88-112

A.bout the Fitzgerald youth," Woodward Boyd wrote in 1922 as she set out to "shoot a few arrows" through the celebrated image of the author as "disillusioned, cynical, and so young": "He is young, certainly, but not so young as to look absurd in long trousers." As she points out, when This Side of Paradise was published in 1920, Fitzgerald was Dickens's age when he completed The Pickwick Papers, only a little younger than Keats when his...

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6. Mencken's Defense of Women and the Marriage Plot of The Beautiful and Damned

MICHAEL NOWLIN

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pp. 113-129

One of F. Scott Fitzgerald's working titles for The Beautiful and Damned was "The Beautiful Lady Without Mercy." Fitzgerald obviously meant this title as an allusion to the work of his favorite poet, the romantic Keats, even as the novel he was writing owed a great deal to the influence of the ostensibly anti-romantic H. L. Mencken. Fitzgerald acknowledged as much...

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7. "One Cannot Both Spend and Have": The Economics of Gender in Fitzgerald's Josephine Stories

MARY McALEER BALKUN

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pp. 130-147

It has long been a given that the idea of emotional bankruptcy is one of F. Scott Fitzgerald's central themes. However, critics have tended to focus upon the "emotional" aspect of the equation, the protagonist's eventual inability to feel and experience fully, rather than to consider the economic implications of the expression.1 A "bankrupt" is one who no longer has the means for exchange, one who has overextended himor herself. The language...

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8. Pastoral Mode and Language in The Great Gatsby

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pp. 148-161

In an account of style in The Great Gatsby, George Garrett observes that the created language of the book "allows for the poetry of intense perception to live simultaneously and at ease with a hard-edged, implacable vulgarity" (Bruccoli, New Essays 1 II). He amplifies this observation by stating that "stylistically Gatsby is a complicated composite of several distinct kinds of prose, ... a composite style whose chief demonstrable point appears...

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9. F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1937: A Manuscript Study of "A Full Life"

HORST H. KRUSE

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pp. 162-181

T he typical Fitzgerald manuscript-with its usual amount of rewriting- always constitutes a definite invitation to reconstruct the process of composition and to relate it to the author's immediate biographical situation and circumstances. In the case of "A Full Life," a comparatively recent addition to the Fitzgerald canon of published writings, such an endeavor turns out to be doubly rewarding, leading not only to a better understanding...

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10. F. Scott Fitzgerald and Willa Cather: A New Study

STANLEY BRODWIN

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pp. 182-198

On February 2, 1921, Fitzgerald wrote to H. L. Mencken and added a short but exclamatory postscript: 'Just finished 'My Antonia'-a great book! Mine is to be called 'The Beautiful and Damned' " (Bruccoli and Duggan 78). In a letter to Cather four years later, Fitzgerald again acknowledged the power of her art and language in a brief apologia disclaiming any "apparent plagiarism" from A Lost Lady. He especially referred to the description...

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11. Noxious Nostalgia: Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and the Legacy of Plantation Fiction

VERONICA MAKOWSKY

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pp. 199-210

"Why do you hate the South?" asks Absalom, Absalomfs Shreve McCannon, a Canadian, of his Mississippi roommate Quentin Compson. "Panting in the cold air" of Harvard, Quentin "immediately" replies, "I dont hate it .... I dont! I dont hate it! I dont hate it!" (303). For about two hundred years, North Americans, southerners and non-southerners alike, have expressed a similar love-hate fascination with the South, particularly with the mixture...

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12. Thalia Does the Charleston: Humor in the Fiction of F. Scott Fitzgerald

D. G. KEHL

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pp. 211-231

In "The Crack-up," F. Scott Fitzgerald observed that "the test of a firstrate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function" (Wilson, The Crack-up 69). This recognition of disparity perhaps serves less to characterize "a first-rate intelligence" than to provide the basis for Fitzgerald's underrated comic sense...

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13. F. Scott Fitzgerald in the Funny Papers: The Commentary of Mickey Mouse and Charlie Brown

M. THOMAS INGE

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pp. 232-246

...popular culture as has F. Scott Fitzgerald. Placing himself and his wife, Zelda, in the public view seems to have been a preoccupation during the early years of his success, perhaps with a conscious eye on the rela tionship between media exposure and the sale of books, but also for the sheer pleasure of conspicuous consumption of his hard-earned money. ...

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14. The "Two Civil Wars" of F. Scott Fitzgerald

FREDERICK WEGENER

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pp. 247-275

In February I940, less than a year before his death, F. Scott Fitzgerald sent Edwin Knopf-head of the scenario department at MGM, where Knopf had arranged the novelist's third lucrative screenwriting job some time earlier-a letter in which he proposed to script a film adapting some of his own fiction set during the Civil War. As he expatiated on this idea, Fitzgerald...

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15. "A Writer for Myself": F. Scott Fitzgerald and Haruki Murakami

TOSHIFUMI MIYAWAKI

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pp. 276-287

A young Japanese woman writer who is now deceased once told a friend, "I wouldn't mind being forgotten forever, if I could shine like Fitzgerald for one moment."! As far as her works are concerned, I see very little evidence of Fitzgerald's influence. But she had an image of him as "shining and sparkling" -and she is not the only one who regards F. Scott Fitzgerald in this way. This image of Fitzgerald...

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16. Pat Hobby and the Fictions of the Hollywood Writer

CHRISTOPHER AMES

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pp. 288-299

P at Hobby is a has-been, and even his reputedly glorious past is shady. But in one of those rare moments in the seventeen stories in which something positive is said about Pat Hobby, a producer recalls that "he used to be a good man for structure" (Fitzgerald, Pat Hobby Stories 30). By structure, Jack Berners means plot outline; for even in the days in which Hobby garnered...

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17. Tune in Next Month: Fitzgerald's Pat Hobby and the Popular Series

TIM PRCHAL

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pp. 300-309

A curious consistency is found in critical appraisals of F. Scott Fitzgerald's Pat Hobby stories. Richard D. Lehan describes them as "very slight" (F. Scott Fitzgerald 164); John A. Higgins tells us they are weak due to their "slightness" (177); Wheeler Winston Dixon contends that they "are slight pieces far below Fitzgerald's normal standards" (II); and Gene D. Phillips feels that the stories "are too slight to be placed among Fitzgerald's finest short fiction"...

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18. Fitzgerald: The Authority of Failure

MORRIS DICKSTEIN

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pp. 310-325

It felt strange indeed in the fall of 1996 to mark the centennial of the birth of F. Scott Fitzgerald, a writer whose work still feels so fresh, who died young and seems perpetually young, like Keats, the poet he most loved. Fitzgerald scholars and enthusiasts met at Princeton to celebrate his life and work, and on his actual birthday I found myself speaking about him at...

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19. The Last Tycoon and Fitzgerald's Last Style

MILTON R. STERN

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pp. 326-341

As Fitzgerald matured in his novelistic development, he steadily hardened his presentations of the actual-the daily circumstances and facticity and events of his protagonists' lives and livelihoods. Concurrently, his style became more sinewy as he incorporated his early attempts at gorgeousness into narrative progress and objectifications of theme. The direction of Fitzgerald's...

Works Cited

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pp. 342-355

List of Contributors

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pp. 356-359

Index

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pp. 360-381