Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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INTRODUCTION. Discipline and Revolution: Classics in Victorian Culture

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pp. 1-19

Victorian Culture and Classical Antiquity is intended to make a contribution to three major areas of scholarship, nineteenth-century studies, Classics, and what is often called Reception Studies. A short version of the agenda will seem straightforward enough: Victorian culture was obsessed...

PART 1. ART AND DESIRE

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CHAPTER ONE. The Art of Reception: J. W. Waterhouse and the Painting of Desire in Victorian Britain

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pp. 23-64

In the 1880s and 1890s, the art galleries of London flared with a burst of painting on classical subjects. Alma-Tadema, Poynter, Leighton, Waterhouse, and a host of less celebrated figures, produced an extraordinary profusion of classicizing canvasses, especially for the Royal...

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CHAPTER TWO. The Touch of Sappho

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pp. 65-83

This chapter picks up from my discussion of Waterhouse some of the most insistent and difficult questions facing reception theory, via the small scope of a single picture. It is concerned first with a double process, which, I argued in chapter 1, is integral to classical reception. An artist...

PART 2. MUSIC AND CULTURAL POLITICS

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CHAPTER THREE. Who Killed Chevalier Gluck?

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pp. 87-124

He had been music tutor to Marie Antoinette in Vienna and, after her marriage to Louis XVI, followed her to Paris, where he was a regular at Versailles. He was celebrated and supported in the very highest echelons of royal Europe. Indeed, he was knighted by the Pope, and...

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CHAPTER FOUR. Wagner’s Greeks: The Politics of Hellenism

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pp. 125-150

After the tearful pleasures of Gluck, this chapter will enter some painful territory: painful for classicists, painful for me as a Jew, and painful for anyone who cares about the development of the twentieth century and the place of Hellenism in it. There is no comfortable...

PART 3. FICTION: VICTORIAN NOVELS OF ANCIENT ROME

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CHAPTER FIVE. For God and Empire

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pp. 153-192

One hero of this section of my book will turn out to be Fred Farrar. F. W. Farrar taught Classics at Harrow before becoming a pioneering headmaster of Marlborough School.1 Later in life, with the easy shift between university, school, and the church characteristic of Victorian society...

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CHAPTER SIX. Virgins, Lions, and Honest Pluck

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pp. 193-244

Edward Bulwer Lytton was “not an easy man to like.”1 His lifelong friend Disraeli may have called Charles Greville the vainest man who had ever lived, but he added “and I don’t forget Cicero and Lytton.”2 To match Cicero as a byword for vanity—and Disraeli was well placed to draw...

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CHAPTER SEVEN. Only Connect!

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pp. 245-264

In the previous two chapters, we have looked at the intellectual background for the Victorian novels set in the early centuries of Christianity in the Roman Empire, and at the novels as a genre, their strategies of representation, their topoi as a style of reception. In this brief...

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CODA

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pp. 265-272

In the ultra-trendy art magazine, The Studio, a magazine that had run important reviews of Waterhouse’s work, some photographs by Wilhelm von Gloeden were published in 1893. Von Gloeden moved from Germany to Sicily in 1878 for his health, where he lived for...

Notes

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pp. 273-311

Bibliography

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pp. 313-340

Index

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pp. 341-352