Cover

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Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

The volumes in the Bard Music Festival series published each year by Princeton University Press follow an unusually accelerated production schedule and is only possible given the professionalism and dedication of many individuals. ...

Permissions and Credits

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Preface

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pp. xv-xx

Viewing Franz Liszt’s career as a whole, one is continually struck by the sheer range of his activities and the diversity of his affiliations. As a young boy in Vienna during the early 1820s, he absorbed the legacy of Czerny, Salieri, and Beethoven. ...

Part I: Essays

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Liszt, Italy, and the Republic of the Imagination

ANNA HARWELL CELENZA

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pp. 3-38

Liszt’s first encounter with Italy has been told time and again in various guises: as a romance, a travelogue, and a Bildungsroman.1 Italy’s breathtaking beauty has been credited with luring him over the Alps. ...

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Heine, Liszt, and the Song of the Future

SUSAN YOUENS

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pp. 39-74

For years, one commentator after another has pointed out that much of what is best in Liszt is encapsulated in his songs and that this repertory deserves more attention than it has received to date. Despite the efforts both of Liszt scholars and performers to make people aware of the works beyond such chestnuts as “Kling’ leise, mein Lied” and “Es muß ein Wunderbares sein” ...

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The Battle Against Instrumental Virtuosity in the Early Nineteenth Century

DANA GOOLEY

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pp. 75-112

When Eduard Hanslick published his compendious history of Viennese concert life in 1869, he mapped that history in four phases, each with its own “book”: the “patriarchal period” (1750–1800), “associations of dilettantes” (1800–30), the “virtuoso era” (1830–48), and “associations of artists” (1848–68). ...

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Prophet and Populace in Liszt’s “Beethoven” Cantatas

RYAN MINOR

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pp. 113-166

In a century when particularist national identities increasingly dominated music’s public spheres, Franz Liszt moved with ease between nations and social movements: the Christian Socialism of the Saint-Simonians in France, a flourishing Hungarian nationalism, the “New German” avant-garde of Weimar and Bayreuth. ...

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“Just Two Words. Enormous Success” Liszt’s 1838 Vienna Concerts

CHRISTOPHER H. GIBBS

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pp. 167-230

For the cosmopolitan and peripatetic Franz Liszt five European cities most shaped, supported, and sustained his life and career: Vienna, Paris, Weimar, Budapest, and Rome—indeed, the last twenty-seven years of his “vie trifurquée” Liszt more or less evenly divided among the final three.1 ...

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Liszt, Wagner, and Unfolding Form: Orpheus and the Genesis of Tristan und Isolde

RAINER KLEINERTZ

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pp. 231-254

Liszt’s possible influence on Wagner is usually discussed primarily with regard to harmony.1 The step from the triadic harmony of the Ring to the chromaticism of Tristan und Isolde, in particular, is often linked to Liszt’s symphonic compositions of the Weimar period. ...

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Publishing Paraphrases and Creating Collectors: Friedrich Hofmeister, Franz Liszt, and the Technology of Popularity

JAMES DEAVILLE

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pp. 255-288

The most neglected aspect in our study of the life of the musical artwork is the publisher. We may know detailed information about the genesis of a piece, yet we are unable to answer basic questions about how that work was disseminated in print: Who was the publisher? What was his relationship with the composer? ...

Part II Biographical Documents

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Liszt on the Artist in Society

RALPH P. LOCKE

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pp. 291-302

In 1835, Liszt wrote and published a long, remarkable essay to which he gave the title De la situation des artistes, et de leur condition dans la société (On the Situation of Artists, and on Their Condition in Society).1 The twenty-three-year old poured into it his excitement about the books, ideas, and musical works that were engaging him at the time, ...

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The First Biography: Joseph d’Ortigue on Franz Liszt at Age Twenty-Three

BENJAMIN WALTON

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pp. 303-334

In conclusion to a somewhat ungenerous review of François-Joseph Fétis’s 1830 music primer, La Musique mise à la portée de tout le monde, Joseph d’Ortigue (1802–66) admitted that his criticisms of the book were perhaps harsh and overly detailed (they certainly were), but justified himself with a statement of intent: ...

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Ludwig Rellstab’s Biographical Sketch of Liszt

ALLAN KEILER

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pp. 335-360

The brief biographical sketch of Liszt by Ludwig Rellstab, which comes at the end of a modest volume in which he gathered together his essays on Liszt’s Berlin performances during the early months of 1842, originally published in the Vossische Zeitung, is one of a small group of biographies of Liszt that appeared during his virtuoso years. ...

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From the Biographer’s Workshop: Lina Ramann’s Questionnaires to Liszt

RENA CHARNIN MUELLER

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pp. 361-372

By 1874, Franz Liszt was sixty-three years old and well into his fabled “vie trifurquée,” the trisected year he spent in the cities of Rome, Weimar, and Budapest on a schedule he was to maintain until his death. Since 1869 he had devoted much of his time giving master classes to a select group of musicians, ...

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The Ramann-Liszt Questionnaires

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pp. 373-424

In the following translation of the questionnaires, Ramann’s original text is given in italics; Liszt’s responses are in normal typeface. Footnotes at the bottom of the page represent commentary by the present author except where specifically noted. ...

Part III Criticism and Reception

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Fétis’s Review of the Transcendental Etudes

PETER BLOOM

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pp. 427-440

The world of music in nineteenth-century Paris, as in many other periods and places, was highly politicized. Reviews in the daily and weekly French press, which underwent tremendous development in what is commonly referred to as the Romantic era, were conditioned by alliances and enmities of a sort still well-known to today’s readers and listeners. ...

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Heinrich Heine on Liszt

RAINER KLEINERTZ

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pp. 441-466

Heinrich Heine was one of the most important German poets in lyrics and prose. He was born into a Jewish family in Düsseldorf on 13 December 1797. The French occupation of the Rhine area and Napoleon Bonaparte’s solemn entry into Düsseldorf (1811) made a strong impression on him. ...

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“Even His Critics Must Concede”: Press Accounts of Liszt at the Bonn Beethoven Festival

JOSÉ ANTONIO BOWEN

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pp. 467-484

The concerts of the Beethoven Bonn Festival in 1845 are perhaps the most completely documented performances of the nineteenth century before Bayreuth. The importance of the occasion drew musical guests such as Ignaz Moscheles, Jenny Lind, Marie Pleyel, Meyerbeer, Berlioz, and Louis Spohr, well-known writers about music such as George Smart, Charles Hallé, and Anton Schindler, ...

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Defending Liszt: Felix Draeseke on the Symphonic Poems

JAMES DEAVILLE

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pp. 485-514

Of the young men and women most associated with Liszt’s cause during the late 1840s and the 1850s, none could rival Felix Draeseke (1835–1913) in terms of analytical perspicacity and compositional audacity. That he later distanced himself from the progressive path of Liszt and colleagues does not diminish his “young radical” role among the so-called New Germans between 1855 and 1862.1 ...

Part IV Reflections on Franz Liszt

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A Mirror to the Nineteenth Century: Reflections on Franz Liszt

LEON BOTSTEIN

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pp. 517-566

This entry in the 1893 edition of the leading satirical German-language lexicon of the nineteenth century, written a half-century earlier by the legendary Hungarian-born Jewish humorist Moritz Saphir (who made his career first in Vienna and then in Berlin), offers a glimpse of the place of public concert life in nineteenth-century culture. ...

Index

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pp. 567-582

Notes on the Contributors

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pp. 583-587