Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Series Page, Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

I am indebted to a large number of people for their assistance and support with this project. Most of all, I thank Ian Randall and Pamela Durso for their tireless guidance throughout multiple drafts of my manuscript spanning many months. Others who helped suggest and review revisions include Keith Jones, Karen Smith, and Anne Phillips. ...

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

1. Southern Baptist Women’s Writings in Context

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-25

Wife. Mother. Children’s worker. Teacher. Missionary. Deacon. Executive. Pastor. Which roles are acceptable for Southern Baptist women? It depends on whom you ask. Southern Baptist Addie Davis demonstrated her view by becoming an ordained minister; pastor’s wife Joyce Rogers, by exhorting each woman to be “submissive to her husband [and] to the male leadership in the church.”1 ...

read more

2. Woman’s Work for Woman, 1906–1918

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-60

WMU began publishing Our Mission Fields in July 1906, at the height of the woman’s missionary movement. During this time, Progressive optimism and activism permeated many missions organizations, influencing missionary activities at home and abroad. ...

read more

3. Supporting the SBC, 1919–1945

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-93

In the years following World War I, mission work declined in popularity as new ways of thinking arose among many Americans. The woman’s missionary movement also gradually weakened. As “woman’s work for woman” thinking evolved into an ideology of “world friendship,” almost all Protestant women’s missions organizations were absorbed into broader denominational structures. ...

read more

4. Cultivating a Christian Influence, 1946–1967

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 94-129

“An informed woman reads Royal Service,” the back cover of that magazine’s February 1962 issue proclaimed. And read—or at least subscribe— the women did. Subscriptions to Royal Service rose from around two hundred thousand in 1946 to nearly five hundred thousand in 1965,1 as WMU and the SBC enjoyed their years of greatest strength. ...

read more

5. Almost Unlimited Possibilities, 1968–1983

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 130-167

Antiwar demonstrations. The assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. Protests against sexism in the Miss America pageant. All of these events dominated American news headlines in 1968, introducing to the United States a new climate of activism, liberation, and reform. ...

read more

6. Developing Spiritually in a Context of Division, 1984–2006

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 168-202

“Be it resolved,” pronounced messengers to the 1984 annual meeting of the SBC, “that we encourage the service of women in all aspects of church life and work other than pastoral functions and leadership roles entailing ordination.”1 Thus began a new era for women in the SBC, including leaders and members of WMU. ...

read more

7. Southern Baptist Women’s Writings in Retrospect

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 203-210

The one unforgivable sin among American evangelicals, according to historian Margaret Bendroth, is “thoughtless capitulation to the secular standards of American culture.”1 More so than adherents of other Christian traditions, evangelicals pride themselves on relying upon what they consider to be the timeless truths of the Bible rather than upon changing cultural mores. ...

Appendixes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-216

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 217-256

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 257-264

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 265-269