Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-xii

Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

One of the most exciting literary and artistic developments of the past forty years is the emergence of the graphic, or comic book, novel. An extended comic book that expands the possibilities of the traditional comic book and that is unconstrained by the cheap production values and severely limited...

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1. Adaptations of the Bible

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pp. 7-24

Several graphic novels have recently appeared as adaptations of one of the earliest Jewish literary works, and certainly one of the most influential: the Hebrew Bible. Since the Bible has become a universal work, I have included non-Jewish as well as Jewish adaptors in this chapter because they present...

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2. Religion and Identity in Art Spiegelman’s Maus

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pp. 25-38

Art Spiegelman is at the forefront of contemporary graphic novelists. He is critically renowned for such work as his avant-garde journal Raw, edited with his wife, Françoise Mouly (who is also a graphic novelist and the art director of the New Yorker), his cartoons for the New Yorker, and his...

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3. The Holocaust Graphic Novel

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pp. 39-81

While Art Spiegelman’s Maus raises many questions about the religious and other dimensions of the Holocaust, more issues remain. The Holocaust (or in Hebrew, the Shoah, which means “catastrophe”) is fraught with unresolvable questions about how this tragedy can or should be remembered in artistic works. Given its enormity, with six million Jews and many, many other...

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4. The Jewish Experience in Europe and Beyond

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pp. 82-117

Graphic novels dealing with the Jewish experience in Europe before and after the Holocaust and in North Africa form the material for this chapter. Vittorio Giardino, an Italian, Joann Sfar, a Frenchman, and American James Sturm have created significant graphic novels about that experience, including elements...

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5. The American Immigrant Experience

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pp. 118-156

Since many of the most important Jewish graphic novelists are the children of immigrants, the theme of Jews as immigrants to the United States has understandably featured heavily in much of their work. Whether set in New York or Cleveland, the idea of Jews having to find their way into American...

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6. Some Female American Jewish Creators

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pp. 157-185

Sharon Rudahl is the creator of, among many other works, A Dangerous Woman, a graphic biography of Emma Goldman, a famous and indeed notorious Russian Jewish immigrant to America who lived during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Rudahl’s biography, which is based...

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7. Identity and Belief in the Israel-Centered Graphic Novel

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pp. 186-216

Rutu Modan’s Exit Wounds, Etgar Keret and Asaf Hanuka’s Pizzeria Kamikaze, Ari Folman and David Polonsky’s Waltz with Bashir, and Galit and Gilad Seliktar’s Farm 54 all deal with Israelis’ perceptions of the contemporary world—what they believe and what kind of country they have...

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8. The Orthodox Graphic Novel

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pp. 217-230

Unlike most of the other graphic novels discussed in this book, which usually stress identity at the expense of religion, the best graphic novels about Orthodoxy reinforce belief. Although it was created by a self-avowed secular artist, Hereville: How Mirka Got Her Sword, by Barry Deutsch, gives a positive...

Notes

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pp. 231-236

Works Cited

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pp. 237-246

Index

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pp. 247-258