Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Although maritime metaphors are not lacking in our book, this scholarly endeavor was truly a voyage of discovery—on so many levels—for its authors over the three years it took to reach this island “port of completion” at the University of Hawai‘i Press. Our coauthored manuscript developed out o...

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Foreword

John R. Gillis

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pp. xi-xiv

“Strictly speaking, oceans do not really exist: they are constructs of the mind, figments of the cartographer’s imagination, landlubbers’ ways of dividing up maritime space according to the lay of the land,” writes Felipe Fernández-Armesto.1 As this pathbreaking book shows, the so-called Spanish Lake...

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Introduction: Iberian Pacific Navigations

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pp. 1-16

In 1761, an army captain in Manila who was also a Jesuit theology student drew a symbolic map of the Spanish empire.1 While defending his thesis that unified the Americas, the Philippines, and the Iberian kingdoms, Vicente de Memije arranged the Hispanic world of Charles III into a sketch of...

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Chapter 1. The Lake before the Nineteenth Century

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pp. 17-36

The degree of Spanish control along the Pacific Rim varied from Asia to the Americas. Whereas the Habsburg rulers managed to build a vast empire in the New World following Columbus’ voyage, their influence in China, Japan, and even island Southeast Asia was a great deal...

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Chapter 2. Defending the Lake

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pp. 37-62

In the fall of the year 1766, the Prince of Masserano painfully inched himself through the Court of St. James to voice his grave concern with the British government. Bothered by one of his frequent bouts of gout, the Spanish ambassador was in a foul mood. From his perspective it had not been...

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Chapter 3. Arming Chinese Mestizos in Manila

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pp. 63-96

When the Spaniards conquered Manila in 1571, they established an outpost of their global empire in Asia that would be linked to the Americas through the port of Acapulco in the Viceroyalty of New Spain until 1815. Las Islas Filipinas, as they were officially designated...

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Chapter 4. Colonizing the Marianas

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pp. 97-118

Spaniards in the early modern period who sailed the Pacific had to become excellent mapmakers. They had to be able to estimate distance and to plot, use, and incorporate their new geographic knowledge. A map’s scale, be it a road map, a physical map, or a political map, helps the viewer...

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Epilogue: The Lingering Lake and Archipelagic Hispanization

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pp. 119-132

In the late 1940s enterprising researcher Emilio Pastor y Santos uncovered a loophole in the diplomatic treaties signed between Spain and the United States in 1898 and between Spain and Germany in 1899. Although these settlements effectively ended Spanish colonialism in the Pacific, Pastor discovered...

Notes

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pp. 133-162

Bibliography

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pp. 163-176

Index

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pp. 177-182

About the Authors, Production Notes, Back Cover

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