In this Book

Encountering Modernity
summary
Scholarly and popular consensus has painted a picture of Indian Buddhist monasticism in which monks and nuns severed all ties with their families when they left home for the religious life. In this view, monks and nuns remained celibate, and those who faltered in their “vows” of monastic celibacy were immediately and irrevocably expelled from the Buddhist Order. This romanticized image is based largely on the ascetic rhetoric of texts such as the Rhinoceros Horn Sutra. Through a study of Indian Buddhist law codes (vinaya), Shayne Clarke dehorns the rhinoceros, revealing that in their own legal narratives, far from renouncing familial ties, Indian Buddhist writers take for granted the fact that monks and nuns would remain in contact with their families.

The vision of the monastic life that emerges from Clarke’s close reading of monastic law codes challenges some of our most basic scholarly notions of what it meant to be a Buddhist monk or nun in India around the turn of the Common Era. Not only do we see thick narratives depicting monks and nuns continuing to interact and associate with their families, but some are described as leaving home for the religious life with their children, and some as married monastic couples. Clarke argues that renunciation with or as a family is tightly woven into the very fabric of Indian Buddhist renunciation and monasticisms.

Surveying the still largely uncharted terrain of Indian Buddhist monastic law codes preserved in Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Chinese, Clarke provides a comprehensive, pan-Indian picture of Buddhist monastic attitudes toward family. Whereas scholars have often assumed that monastic Buddhism must be anti-familial, he demonstrates that these assumptions were clearly not shared by the authors/redactors of Indian Buddhist monastic law codes. In challenging us to reconsider some of our most cherished assumptions concerning Indian Buddhist monasticisms, he provides a basis to rethink later forms of Buddhist monasticism such as those found in Central Asia, Kaśmīr, Nepal, and Tibet not in terms of corruption and decline but of continuity and development of a monastic or renunciant ideal that we have yet to understand fully.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction: Modernity and the Materiality of Religion
  2. Albert L. Park and David K. Yoo
  3. pp. 1-16
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part I: Economy and Religion
  2. pp. 17-18
  1. Chapter 1. A Sacred Economy of Value and Production: Capitalism and Protestantism in Early Modern Korea (1885–1919)
  2. Albert L. Park
  3. pp. 19-46
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 2. Taking Jesus Public: The Neoliberal Transformation of Korean Megachurches
  2. Eun Young Lee Easley
  3. pp. 47-68
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part II: Religion and Social Relations
  2. pp. 69-70
  1. Chapter 3. Guanxi and Gospel: Mapping Christian Networks in South China
  2. Joseph Tse-Hei Lee
  3. pp. 71-94
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 4. Accidental Pilgrims: Modernity, Migration, and Christian Conversion among Contemporary Taiwanese Americans
  2. Carolyn Chen
  3. pp. 95-116
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part III: The Sacred and Social Activism
  2. pp. 117-118
  1. Chapter 5. Christianity and Civil Society in Colonial Korea: The Civil Society Movement of Cho Man-sik and the P’yŏngyang YMCA against Japanese Colonialism
  2. Kyusik Chang
  3. pp. 119-139
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 6. Between Mission and Medicine: The Early History of Severance Hospital
  2. Yunjae Park
  3. pp. 140-161
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 7. Kagawa Toyohiko (1888–1960) and the Japanese Christian Impact on American Society
  2. Mark R. Mullins
  3. pp. 162-194
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part IV: Religion and National Identity
  2. pp. 195-196
  1. Chapter 8. Preaching Modern Japan: National Imaginaries and Protestant Sermons in Meiji and Taishō Tokyo
  2. Garrett L. Washington
  3. pp. 197-223
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 9. “Smelling of Pickled Radish, Not Butter”: The Wartime Search for a Christianity Viable in Japan
  2. Gregory Vanderbilt
  3. pp. 224-253
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 10. Diasporic Korean Christianity in the United States, 1922–1941
  2. David K. Yoo
  3. pp. 254-277
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 11 Protestant Christianity in Reform-Era China: Realities and Representations
  2. David Ownby
  3. pp. 278-308
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Selected Bibliography
  2. pp. 309-328
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 329-330
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 331-343
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Production Notes, Back Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.