Cover, Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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p. vii

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xxix

Les Frères Kip (The Kip Brothers) is one of those rare Jules Verne novels originally published as part of his Voyages extraordinaires that has, until now, never been translated into English.1 Why? Some Verne scholars have suggested that British and American publishers...

PART I

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1. Tavern of the Three Magpies

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pp. 3-17

At that time—18851—forty-six years after its occupation by Great Britain, which had made it part of New South Wales, and thirty-two years after its independence from the Crown, New Zealand, now self-governing, was still devoured by gold fever. The disorders created...

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2. The Brig James Cook

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pp. 18-28

The brig James Cook,1 with a capacity of two hundred and fifty tons, was a solid ship with strong sails and a deep hull that assured its stability. Boasting a slender stern and a raised bow, it handled excellently at all sailing speeds, and its masts were slightly inclined....

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3. Vin Mod at Work

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pp. 28-44

The distance between Dunedin and Wellington, through the strait that separates the two large islands, is less than four hundred miles.1 If the northwest breeze held steady and the sea remained calm along the coast, at the rate of ten miles an hour, the...

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4. At Wellington

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pp. 45-62

The city of Wellington is built on the southwest point of North Island at the far side of a horseshoe-shaped bay. Well protected from the sea winds, it offers excellent moorings. The brig had been favored by the weather, but such was not always the case. It...

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5. A Few Days At Sea

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pp. 62-73

It was six o’clock in the morning when the JAMES COOK hoisted anchor and, with all sails set, began to get under way. The captain had to maneuver his way through the harbor and leave it through a narrow opening. After skirting Point Nicholson, thanks to...

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6. In Sight of Norfolk Island

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pp. 73-86

A nearly perfect quadrilateral island on three sides, its fourth side features a rounded coastline that rises and modifies its regularity by jutting toward the northwest. At its four corners are Point Howe, Northeast Point, Point Blackbourne, and Rocky Point. More...

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7. The Two Brothers

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pp. 86-100

At daybreak, a dense fog covered the western horizon. The rocky shore of Norfolk Island could barely be distinguished. No doubt those mists would soon dissipate. The peak of Mount Pitt rose above the fog and was already bathed in the sun’s rays....

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8. The Coral Sea

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pp. 100-114

The Coral Sea About fourteen hundred miles separate Norfolk Island from New Ireland. After completing five hundred, the first land that the JAMES COOK would sight would be the Caledonia, which also includes the little group of Loyalty Islands...

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9. Crossing the Louisiade

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pp. 114-130

The next day, November 15th, some thirty miles toward the northwest was all that the James Cook had managed since the day before. The breeze had fallen at dusk, and the night was calm and hot. Passengers and crew spent it on deck. Sleeping in the cabins in...

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10. Heading North

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pp. 131-144

When the last shades of night had dissipated, all eyes searched the sea around the brig. The James Cook was still in the same place as the day before, at three miles to the east of D’Entrecasteaux Island, as if it had been anchored there. No current could be felt,...

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11. Port Praslin

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pp. 144-159

The first visitor to present himself on board the brig was Mr. Zieger, a New Ireland businessman in commercial relations with the Hawkins firm.1 Middle-aged and vigorous, having lived for some twelve years in Port Praslin, Mr. Zieger2 had founded this company...

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12. Three Weeks in the Archipelago

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pp. 159-173

The following days were employed in unloading the cargo from the brig. Len Cannon and his companions did not refuse to give a hand. Mr. Gibson had no suspicion of their plans....

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13. The Murder

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pp. 174-184

As soon as he had given his last instructions so that the James Cook would be ready for sailing the next morning at daybreak, the captain disembarked and went first to the office....

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14. Incidents

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pp. 185-199

The distance between the Bismarck Archipelago and Tasmania is approximately two thousand four hundred miles. With a favorable wind and an average of a hundred miles per twenty-four hours, the James Cook would take no more than three weeks to traverse it....

PART II

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1. Hobart Town

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pp. 203-213

Tasmania, discovered in 1642 by the Hollander Abel Tasman, drenched in the blood of the Frenchman Manon1 in 1772, visited by Cook in 1784 and by D’Entrecasteaux in 1793, was finally recognized to be an island by Mr. Bass, surgeon of the Australian colony....

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2. Future Projects

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pp. 214-226

It has not been forgotten that, wishing to extend his business, the shipowner had gone to New Zealand in order to found a bank with Mr. Balfour, one of the honorable merchants of Wellington. Nat Gibson, who accompanied him in this voyage, was to be the...

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3. Last Maneuver

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pp. 226-237

The satisfaction of Mr. Hawkins was complete when he received a visit the next day by Karl and Pieter Kip. He was happy that his intervention with the Arnemniden firm had been successful, but he didn’t feel that this favor deserved their thanks. All his credit, all his...

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4. Before the Maritime Court

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pp. 238-251

Given the sad events that had taken place on the James Cook during the course of its last voyage, it is not surprising that they had created a considerable stir in Hobart Town. When, on the one hand, there was the murder of Captain Gibson, committed under mysterious...

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5. The Follow-Up

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pp. 251-263

The effect of this last declaration by the bosun on all those present in the courtroom is difficult to describe.1 In the audience a long and painful murmuring grew so loud that the magistrate had difficulty suppressing it. All eyes were fixed...

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6. The Verdict

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pp. 263-275

The inquest was drawing to an end. The Kip brothers had been interrogated and confronted by the bosun who was their adversary—or, rather, who was their only accuser to date and the only one who had discovered the condemnatory items in the Kips’...

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7. Awaiting Execution

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pp. 275-286

The Kip brothers had nothing further to expect from the justice system: it had condemned them, without even admitting the extenuating circumstances for the crime attributed to them. None of the arguments presented by the defense had swayed the jury—neither...

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8. Port Arthur

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pp. 286-300

These two convicts did not work in the same squad. Separated one from the other, unable to exchange a word or glance, they had in common neither a mess hall nor lodging. Each went his own way, clad in the ignoble tunic of the galley slave, pummeled...

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9. Together

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pp. 301-313

Karl Kip, after having been transported in the captain’s carriage to the penitentiary in Port Arthur, was brought to one of the rooms in the infirmary where his brother, authorized to stay at his side, was not long in rejoining him....

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10. The Fenians

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pp. 313-327

Already, two centuries before, the Catholic subjects of Green Erin had endured widespread persecution when the soldiers of Cromwell, as intolerant as they were vicious, tried to impose on the Irish populations the yoke of reform. The persecuted resisted...

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11. The Note

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pp. 327-337

“The day after tomorrow, May 5th, as soon as the opportunity presents itself during your outdoor work detail, find your way, all three of you, to the Saint James Point on the west coast of Storm Bay, where the ship will send its launch.1 If the...

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12. Saint James Point

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pp. 338-350

The next evening, a little after seven, at intervals of a few minutes each, three flashes of light illuminated the high walls of the penitentiary behind Port Arthur. Three loud detonations followed. It was the alarm cannon whose sound, originating at ground level...

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13. Escape

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pp. 350-360

As mentioned, if escapes were sometimes successful from the penitentiary of Port Arthur, then they had to involve going out to sea. Either the convicts succeeded in securing a boat, or they constructed it...

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14. Mr. Hawkins Follows Up

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pp. 361-372

At Hobart Town, for several months, the Kip affair had been the topic of intense discussion. Had there been a reversal in the public’s opinion? Was there a majority who now thought that Karl and Pieter Kip were no longer the murderers of Captain Gibson? No! For...

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15. The New Fact

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pp. 373-382

Was it conceivable that the Kip brothers, after having had that unhoped-for opportunity to flee to America, had then returned to Tasmania? They, the murderers of Captain Gibson, had come back? Might it be that the boat on which they had taken passage when...

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16. Conclusion

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pp. 382-388

For some time now, it has been known—as a result of various interesting ophthalmologic experiments done by certain ingenious scientists, authoritative observers that they are—that the images of exterior objects imprinted upon the retina of the eye can be...

Notes

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pp. 389-432

Bibliography

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pp. 433-466

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Jules Gabriel Verne: A Biography

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pp. 467-475

Jules Gabriel Verne was born on February 8, 1828, to a middle-class family in the port city of Nantes, France. His mother, Sophie, née Allotte de la Fuÿe, was the daughter of a prominent family of shipowners, and his father, Pierre Verne, was an attorney and the son of...

About the Contributors

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p. 476