Cover

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Title

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Copyright

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Contents

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pp. 3-4

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Introduction – what are galls and what causes them

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pp. 5-12

The oak marble galls pictured right and the robin’s pincushion galls (facing page and p. 59) that perch on wild rose bushes are well known to most people with an interest in natural history and the countryside. Some people will be familiar with other plant galls, such as the nail galls that develop on lime leaves (see p. 50), without necessarily knowing what causes them, ...

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Oak Galls

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pp. 13-30

Our two native oaks – the pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) and the sessile oak (Quercus petrae) – together with their very common hybrid, support a great many galls and the introduced Turkey oak (Quercus cerris) also plays host to a fair number. Between them, these oaks support over 50 different galls in the British Isles. ...

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Galls on Other Trees and Shrubs

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pp. 31-69

The gall mite Acalitus brevitarsus induces pale, slightly domed, blister-like swellings on the uppersides of alder leaves (far right). Below these swellings, on the underside (near right) of the leaf, there is a pale erineum which, when viewed with a hand lens, can be seen to consist of a mat of shiny, glass-like hairs. ...

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Galls on Herbaceous Plants

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pp. 70-92

Yellow blisters developing on both leaf surfaces of alexanders in spring and summer are galls of the rust fungus Puccinia smyrnii. Also found on the stems, which may become thickened and distorted, the galls bear the aecia of the fungus (see p. 7) which produce spores that can infect new plants immediately. ...

Further Reading

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p. 93

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Acknowledgements

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p. 94

Michael Chinery would like to thank the following members of the British Plant Gall Society for their help and encouragement throughout the planning and preparation of this book: Jerry Bowdrey, Rex Hancy, Keith Harris, Tom Higginbottom, Joe Ostojá-Starzewski, Tom Preece, Margaret Redfern, Peter Shirley, and Brian Spooner, ...

Index of Host Plants

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p. 95

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The British Plant Gall Society

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p. 96

The British Plant Gall Society was formed in 1985 in response to the growing interest in the study of plant galls, their causers, and their other inhabitants. Although called the British Plant Gall Society, the Society’s interests are by no means confined to the British Isles and it aims to bring together cecidologists, both amateur and professional, from all over the world. ...