Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Other Works in the Series, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vii

List of Illustrations and Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xvi

These are exciting times for the science of animal social behavior. Researchers have succeeded in eavesdropping on the social lives of marked individuals in free-living populations of an impressive array of species. New methods for determining genetic relationships and parentage have revealed previously hidden forms of social organization. Sophisticated yet testable theories and models have accounted for some of the unity and the diversity that have been discovered. Important...

read more

1 Hormonal Mechanisms

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-33

Social behavior has been linked to many hormones. The best established connections are to steroid hormones, pituitary prolactin, and a few peptide neurohormones (table 1.1). What are these hormones that have been shown to be important for social behavior? How do they work? How are they regulated by the physical environment and the social world? This chapter presents some essential facts and concepts that will inform the rest of the book. It also shares exciting discoveries...

read more

2 Mating, Fighting, Parenting, and Signaling

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 34-91

Behavior such as mating and parenting has fairly obvious fitness consequences but those consequences are not always so obvious for other social behaviors. Nor is it obvious when mating or parenting are done in bizarre ways, for example, by forced copulation that causes injury or by eating the babies. Animal behaviorists have made great progress understanding the functions of many social behaviors, thanks...

read more

3 Social Relationships and Social Organization

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 92-130

When multiple individuals are observed, patterns of social behavior emerge into view. The species typical social behavioral repertoire is not directed evenly or randomly toward conspecifics. Instead, biases toward or away from others reflect social relationships that vary as a function of age, sex, time, and place. The overall configuration of these relationships, or social organization, is to some extent species typical and, like other features of animal life, highly diverse. For beavers, defense..

read more

4 Development of Sexes and Types

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 131-178

Social behavior can be sexually dimorphic as a result of natural or sexual selection. This chapter examines how these sex differences develop, that is, how dimorphic adult behavioral phenotypes are created during ontogeny. Steroids are central to understanding this process of sexual differentiation. Important themes include the distinction between organizational and activational effects of hormones...

read more

5 Evolutionary Change and Species Differences

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-223

In previous chapters the relationships between steroids and social behavior have been treated in a largely static manner, as if species are discrete categories eternally frozen in time with no history prior to their own ontogenies. This chapter brings into the picture the evolution of phenotypes over relatively short timescales, as in speciation or population divergence. Large-scale evolution (comparisons of...

read more

6 Life Stages and Life Histories

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 224-255

Mice live fast and die young, producing large litters in rapid succession if they survive at all. Elephants live slow and die old, producing a single offspring at long intervals. A male anglerfish (Borophryne) spends his entire adult life attached parasite-style to a female whose size dwarfs his, and neither sex reaches reproductive maturity until it finds the other, a bizarre but reproductively effective...

read more

7 Phylogeny: Conservation and Innovation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 256-284

Tinbergen’s fourth aimand approach for understanding behavior was phylogenetic history. Since his time, enormous advances have been made in phylogenetic methods for analyzing and interpreting both organismal and molecular (genomic) characters. “Trees of life” in the form of cladograms based on shared derived organismal and molecular characters are being constructed that constitute more objective and testable hypotheses about the actual history of life on earth than...

read more

Afterword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 285-286

The Preface explained that the goal of this book is to encourage crossing the bridge between behavioral endocrinology, on one side, and behavioral ecology (and other versions of animal behavior), on the other side. The hope was that by using the book as a road map, the traveler can reach a more informed and conceptually elevated vantage point, one providing integrated views of whole forests and not..

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 287-364

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 365-411