Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Series Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 6

The beautiful illustrations of Marilou Florian, Lynn Bartosch, Phyllis Pollard, Shirley Watkins, and Karen Teramura found in Mosses of Eastern North America by Crum and Anderson add immeasurable grace and usefulness to this guide. We thank Columbia University Press for granting permission to use these drawings and species measurements. ...

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 7

Sample Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 8

read more

How to Use this Book

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 9

Find the section of the book where the colored side tabs match the Key Features of your moss. Compare your moss to the photographs, drawings, and species descriptions until you find the species that best fits your sample. ...

read more

Key Features

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 10-15

Take a look at a clump of moss, then tease it apart to examine one strand. Choose the category that best matches your specimen. ...

Key Features Path to the Keys

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 16-17

read more

How to Look at a Moss

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 18-20

First, note its surroundings. Are you in an urban park, along a stream in a forest, in a bog? Is the moss growing on disturbed soil, the bark of a tree, a rock, a rotting log? Moss identification is often aided by knowing where the plant was growing. ...

read more

Collecting Mosses

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 20-21

A reference collection is useful for teaching others about moss diversity as well as comparing new finds to specimens that you have previously identified. Refrain from collecting where prohibited, such as in national and state parks. ...

read more

What Are Mosses?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-24

Most of us as children learn iconic figures for a tree, a bird and a flower. With maturity we learn to recognize more than one species in each of these categories. Not so with mosses, despite their ubiquity and accessibility. The book you are holding is a celebration of moss species diversity and an attempt to help you discover a larger world at your feet and fingertips. ...

Basic Structure of Mosses

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 25

Life History of Mosses

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-27

read more

What Good Are Mosses?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 28-32

Man

read more

Species Treatments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-339

Dull yellow green to blue green, pillowy cushions. Stems are upright, 2–6 cm high, sparsely forked, densely clothed with hairlike curly leaves, and topped by apple-round capsules on slender stalks. When dry, leaves are loosely and irregularly curled and twisted; wet, the leaves straighten and are held at 60 degrees from stems. ...

read more

How to Use the Identification Keys

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 340

An identification key is a tool, a systematic, step-by-step approach to identify a plant. Our keys are dichotomous, which means they are made of paired descriptions, called couplets. Always begin with couplet 1 and read both of the contrasting descriptions, called leads. ...

Keys

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 341-379

Habitat Lists

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 380-383

Moss Publications and Resources

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 384

read more

Moss Names

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 385

A name serves as a means of reference for communication and information retrieval. To look up a friend’s telephone number, you start with his name. Or to learn more about your favorite sports hero, you might type her name into Wikipedia and click search. ...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 386-391

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 392