Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

...First I would like to thank the Life Sciences Editor of Princeton University Press, Sam Elworthy, for contacting me in the first place with the suggestion that I write this book. I also thank Sam and the other staff at Princeton University Press for their helpfulness...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-6

...and a decomposer subsystem. These components are obligately dependent upon one another, with the producers acting as the primary source of organic carbon for the system, and the decomposers being responsible for the breakdown of organic matter and the release and cycling of nutrients. Any approach to better...

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2. The Soil Food Web: Biotic Interactions and Regulators

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pp. 7-55

...which are responsible for determining the amounts of carbon that enter the system. However, in the case of the decomposer food web, the heterotrophic organisms are ultimately responsible for governing...

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3. Plant Species Control of Soil Biota and Processes

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pp. 56-104

...turn affect soil processes that ultimately determine plant growth. However, plant species differ tremendously with regard to the quality of organic matter that they return to the soil, and this in itself has important consequences for both the soil biota and...

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4. Belowground Consequences of Aboveground Food Web Interactions

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pp. 105-137

...food web and the processes that it regulates are influenced both by the productivity of the plant community and by the quality of the resources that the plant community produces. However, in...

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5. Completing the Circle: How Soil Food Web Effects Are Manifested Aboveground

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pp. 138-182

...that the soil biota is responsive to the amounts of plant material returned to the soil (chapter 2), the quality of resource input and the composition of the plant community (chapter 3), and the composition...

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6. The Regulation and Function of Biological Diversity

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pp. 183-238

...biotic interactions among organisms, with an emphasis on associations between aboveground and belowground organisms, and the consequences of these for community and ecosystem properties. However, the conceptual basis of these chapters is...

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7. Global Change Phenomena in an Aboveground-Belowground Context

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pp. 239-294

...few centuries has had a major effect on the Earth’s ecosystems. Over a third of the Earth’s land surface, including most of that which is fertile and capable of supporting high NPP, has been transformed by human activity (Vitousek...

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8. Underlying Themes

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pp. 295-308

...regulation involving competition are clearly important regulatory forces for many groups of biota both above- and belowground. In the decomposer subsystem this is especially apparent in the microfood-web subsystem involving microorganisms, nematodes...

References

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pp. 309-386

Index

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pp. 387-392