Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

Elaine Sisman

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pp. ix-xiii

The year 1997 marks the two-hundredth anniversary of the composition of Haydn's six string quartets Op. 76, an extraordinary group of works that comprised his last completed instrumental opus. Although he was to write two more string quartets (Op. 77, 1799), he never finished the third that would have completed the set (Op. 103, ca. 1802). The only other work of 1797 occupying Haydn was his ongoing composition of The Creation...

PART I ESSAYS

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Haydn, Shakespeare, and the Rules of Originality

ELAINE SISMAN

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pp. 3-56

This essay's point of departure is Haydn's celebrated description, late in life, of how he came to be "original." To Griesinger, who was inter-viewing him for a biography, he put the best face on his years as This is a remarkable claim, in both meaning and context. To take the context first, we see that Haydn's claim of originality is based first on ...

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The Creation, Haydn's Late Vocal Music, and the Musical Sublime

JAMES WEBSTER

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pp. 57-102

In recent years, many "newer" musicologies have turned away from the ideal of absolute music, which had been dominant since the late nineteenth century, in favor of what I would call the various contextual aspects of music. Although this "turn" has primarily affected the understanding of nineteenth- and twentieth-century music, as well as opera, scholars of eighteenth-century instrumental music have not been immune. Regarding...

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Haydn's London Piano Trios and His Salomon String Quartets: Private vs. Public?

MARY HUNTER

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pp. 103-130

It is a truism of the Haydn literature that the six string quartets of 1793 are "public" pieces, while the twelve late piano trios of 1795-1796 belong to a "private" musical sphere. That is, the string quartets Op. 71 and 74 were intended at least in the first instance for professional performance by Johann Peter Salomon and his quartet before London's large paying concert audiences. By contrast, the piano trios Hob.XV: 18-29, also published in London, are chamber music in a more literal sense, written...

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The Symphony as Pindaric Ode

MARK EVAN BONDS

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pp. 131-153

Recent decades have witnessed great advances in our understanding of how Haydn's symphonies were performed during his lifetime, yet we still know relatively little about how the composer's contemporaries actually perceived this music. What did Haydn's original audiences hear in his symphonies? In one sense, there ought to be as many answers to this question as there were individual listeners. But virtually none of those listeners...

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Representing the Aristocracy:The Operatic Haydn and Le pescatrici

REBECCA GREEN

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pp. 154-200

The subject of "Haydn" usually summons up the composer of instrumental music, a father whose progeny was generic rather than genetic, an artist whose musical authority is taken for granted, and an early middle-class success story: wheelwright's son discovers fame and fortune in the concert halls of London. The operatic Haydn is a different subject altogether, a figure still only dimly recognizable despite the considerable time...

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Haydn as Orator: A Rhetorical Analysis of His Keyboard Sonata in D Major, Hob.XVI:42

TOM BEGHIN

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pp. 201-254

Prince Nicolaus II EsterMzy in 1783, Haydn dedicated three piano sonatas to her, publishing them with Bossier the following year. All "ladies' sonata" by L&szlo Somfai, and all have fast, brilliant, and capricious finales.1 Of the three finales, that in no. 42 handily beats the others in capriciousness. It is a scherzo in 2/4 with highly unusual ...

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The Demise of Philosophical Listening: Haydn in the Nineteenth Century

LEON BOTSTEIN

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pp. 255-286

The history of the critical and cultural reception of music remains inextricably bound to shifting conceptions of what, in the final analysis, constitutes the work of music. When a historically discrete musical public—that is, listeners and amateur performers—maintains over time particular conceptions of how music functions, what music means, and what the essence of the musical experience is, expectations about music become...

PART II DOCUMENTS

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Johann Ferdinand von Schönfeld, A Yearbook of Music in Vienna and Prague 1196 I. Special Friends, Protectors, and Connoisseurs in Vienna II. Virtuosos and Amateurs in Vienna III. Amateur Concerts

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pp. 289-320

Johann Ferdinand Ritter von Schonfeld (1750-1821), originally from Prague and with a publishing house there, opened one in Vienna in 1783 and spent time in both places. His almanac lists him only as someone who holds private "dilettante academies," or amateur concerts, at which "strangers are welcome." He may or may not have writ-...

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Johann Karl Friedrich Triest, Remarks on the Development of the Art of Music in Germany in the Eighteenth Century (1801)

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pp. 321-394

Pastor Triest of Stettin (1764-1810) had a small but important role to play in music history. His ambitious serialized article on eighteenthcentury German music appeared in the relatively new but influential periodical (Allgemeine musikalisclie Zeitung), put out by the important firm of Breitkopf & Hartel in Leipzig. It was significant in at least three respects. First, it argued for the pre-eminence of Johann Sebastian Bach in establishing a "German music," and thus was preparatory to the "Bach revival" of the...

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Maria Hörwarthner, Joseph Haydn's Library: An Attempt at a Literary-Historical Reconstruction

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pp. 395-464

In the ground-breaking 1976 volume of the Yearbook for Austrian Cultural History, Herbert Zeman edited a collection of essays and documents called Joseph Haydn and the Literature of His Time. By revealing the intellectual and social contexts and institutions surrounding Haydn?the literary salons, correspondence, relationship to English ...

Index

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pp. 465-472

List of Contributors

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pp. 473-474