Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

“Books are your friends,” my mother told me as she read to me from the Bible storybook and the Childcraft books. They held stories that, as an only child, I embraced and cherished as my friends. Such has been my fascination with stories. I love listening to and telling stories. I love reading stories. So, imagine my joy when I discovered narrative therapy that honored stories to enrich personal identity...

read more

1. Storying Spiritual Narratives

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

When is a story just a story? When is a story much more than a story? When is the story we think we know obscuring a much richer story? These questions and more lay at the root of my lifelong quest to understand the power of story. Growing up in a southern rural community, I learned the art of storytelling from my family and neighbors. I often heard with some admiration, “She sure is a good storyteller.” I also heard with disapproval, “He sure can tell some big stories!” ...

read more

2. Voicing Narrative and Liberation Practices

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-32

Spiritual narratives, as identified in the previous chapter, draw from both an explicit and implicit theological grounding as well as from insights of narrative practice. Providing a multivoiced conversation between narrative therapy and liberation theology is essential in laying both theological and practice focused foundations for uncovering those spiritual narratives...

read more

3. Pastoral Caring through Spiritual Narratives

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-48

Pastoral care often quietly listens to the grief of people having lost loved ones, confronts in the face of addictions, supports steadily when illness arrives. Pastoral care also celebrates with the start of coupled life, blesses new life, congratulates job promotions. The minister is privileged to join with people in their seasons of life through pastoral care...

read more

4. Narratively Ministering to Congregations and Communities

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-64

Contemporary congregations and community ministries run the gamut from those that do not seem to have left the stereotypical 1950s to communities that seem never to use the words Jesus or even God in their mission statements. Determining what a congregation or ministry is can even be difficult. The growing pluralism and multiculturalism in our society has broadened the criteria for community ministries that qualify as nonprofit organizations...

read more

5. Storytelling as Spiritual Practice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-80

Spiritual narratives as discussed so far have the capacity to thicken a believer’s faith story. That people’s personal stories directly affect their faith journey is a foundation for these principles. Stories are understood as a telling of life experience in a form that can be repeated and modified over time. The telling and retelling of the stories as a process itself affords another experience that with the historical events the person is telling both affects and forms his or her identity...

read more

6. Spiritual Narratives of Place

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-94

Uncovering stories of our lives that richly develop our spirituality so far has focused on those stories that live within our memories of the past and our hopes for the future. These stories are often populated by those relationships, values, and hopes that give meaning to our lives. Re-storying or re-authoring asks us to consider the effects of these stories on the people in our lives as well as on our hopes and dreams...

read more

Epilogue: Future Storying of Spiritual Narratives

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-96

Narratively leading, teaching, worshipping, and caring join together in an understanding of liberative narrative ministry. It endeavors to find “unity through diversity” by recognizing the individual and collective expression of spiritual narratives with the witness of a faith community. The pastoral leader of a particular faith community seeks to be a storyteller of hope in which he or she does not abdicate responsibility but listens attentively to the stories that believers privilege for their own lives...

Appendix

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-114

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-120

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF