In this Book

Narratives of Greater Mexico
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
Once relegated to the borders of literature—neither Mexican nor truly American—Chicana/o writers have always been in the vanguard of change, articulating the multicultural ethnicities, shifting identities, border realities, and even postmodern anxieties and hostilities that already characterize the twenty-first century. Indeed, it is Chicana/o writers’ very in-between-ness that makes them authentic spokespersons for an America that is becoming increasingly Mexican/Latin American and for a Mexico that is ever more Americanized. In this pioneering study, Héctor Calderón looks at seven Chicana and Chicano writers whose narratives constitute what he terms an American Mexican literature. Drawing on the concept of “Greater Mexican” culture first articulated by Américo Paredes, Calderón explores how the works of Paredes, Rudolfo Anaya, Tomás Rivera, Oscar Zeta Acosta, Cherríe Moraga, Rolando Hinojosa, and Sandra Cisneros derive from Mexican literary traditions and genres that reach all the way back to the colonial era. His readings cover a wide span of time (1892–2001), from the invention of the Spanish Southwest in the nineteenth century to the América Mexicana that is currently emerging on both sides of the border. In addition to his own readings of the works, Calderón also includes the writers’ perspectives on their place in American/Mexican literature through excerpts from their personal papers and interviews, correspondence, and e-mail exchanges he conducted with most of them.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. CONTENTS
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  2. pp. ix-xi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. INTRODUCTION
  2. pp. xii-xix
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. REDEFINING THE BORDERLANDS: From the Spanish Southwest to Greater Mexico,from Charles F. Lummis to Am
  2. pp. 1-27
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. WRITING THE DREAMS OF LA NUEVA MÉXICO: Rudolfo A. Anaya’s Bless Me, Ultimaand the Southwest Literary Tradition
  2. pp. 28-64
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. THE EMERGENCE OF THECHICANO NOVEL:T omás Rivera’s “. . . y no se lo tragó la tierra” and the Community of Readers
  2. pp. 65-84
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. “A RECORDER OF EVENTS WITH A SOUR STOMACH”: Oscar Zeta Acosta and The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo
  2. pp. 85-110
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. “MAKING FAMILIA FROM SCRATCH”: Cherríe L. Moraga’s Self-Portraits
  2. pp. 111-137
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. “MEXICANOS AL GRITODE GUERRA”: Rolando Hinojosa’s Cronicón del condado de Belken
  2. pp. 138-166
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. “COMO MÉXICO NO HAY DOS”: Sandra Cisneros’s Feminist Border Stories
  2. pp. 167-213
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Epilogue: AM
  2. pp. 214-218
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. NOTES
  2. pp. 219-250
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. WORKS CITED
  2. pp. 251-269
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. PERMISSIONS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  2. pp. 270-271
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. INDEX
  2. pp. 272-284
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.