In this Book

University of California Press
summary
In this stimulating and highly original study of the writing of American history, twenty-four scholars from eleven European countries explore the impact of writing history from abroad. Six distinguished scholars from around the world add their commentaries.

Arguing that historical writing is conditioned, crucially, by the place from which it is written, this volume identifies the formative impact of a wide variety of institutional and cultural factors that are commonly overlooked. Examining how American history is written from Europe, the contributors shed light on how history is written in the United States, and, indeed, on the way history is written anywhere. The innovative perspectives included in Historians across Borders are designed to reinvigorate American historiography as the rise of global and transnational history is creating a critical need to understand the impact of place on the writing and teaching of history.

This book is designed for students in historiography, global and transnational history, and related courses in the United States and abroad, for US historians, and for anyone interested in how historians work.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. From the Publisher
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
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  1. Preface: Location and History
  2. Nicolas Barreyre, Michael Heale, Stephen Tuck, and Cécile Vidal
  3. pp. ix-xviii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xix-xx
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  1. Part One: Historiography
  2. pp. 1-2
  1. 1. Watersheds in Time and Place: Writing American History in Europe
  2. Michael Heale, Sylvia Hilton, Halina Parafianowicz, Paul Schor, and Maurizio Vaudagna
  3. pp. 3-34
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  1. Part Two: Structures and Context
  2. pp. 35-36
  1. 2. Using the American Past for the Present: European Historians and the Relevance of Writing American History
  2. Tibor Frank, Martin Klimke, and Stephen Tuck
  3. pp. 37-55
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  1. 3. Institutions, Careers, and the Many Paths of U.S. History in Europe
  2. Max Edling, Vincent Michelot, Joånrg Nagler, Sandra Scanlon, and Irmina Wawrzyczek
  3. pp. 56-74
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  1. 4. Straddling Intellectual Worlds: Positionality and the Writing of American History
  2. Nicolas Barreyre, Manfred Berg, and Simon Middleton
  3. pp. 75-92
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  1. Part Three: Internationalization(s) of U.S. History
  2. pp. 93-94
  1. 5. Writing American History from Europe: The Elusive Substance of the Comparative Approach
  2. Susanna Delfino and Marcus Gräser
  3. pp. 95-117
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  1. 6. American Foreign Relations in European Perspectives: Geopolitics and the Writing of History
  2. Hans Krabbendam, Pauline Peretz, Mario del Pero, and Helle Porsdam
  3. pp. 118-140
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  1. 7. Location and the Conceptualization of Historical Frameworks: Early American History and Its Multiple Reconfigurations in the United States and in Europe
  2. Trevor Burnard and Cécile Vidal
  3. pp. 141-162
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  1. Part Four: Perspectives from Elsewhere
  2. pp. 163-164
  1. 8. Positionality, Ambidexterity, and Global Frames
  2. Thomas Bender
  3. pp. 165-173
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  1. 9. Reflections from Russia
  2. Ivan Kurilla
  3. pp. 174-180
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  1. 10. Doing U.S. History in Australia: A Comparative Perspective
  2. Ian Tyrrell
  3. pp. 181-188
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  1. 11. Viewing American History from Japan: The Potential of Comparison
  2. Natsuki Aruga
  3. pp. 189-197
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  1. 12. Not Quite at Home: Writing American History in Denmark
  2. David E. Nye
  3. pp. 198-205
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  1. 13. American History in the Shadow of Empire: A Plea for Marginality
  2. François Furstenberg
  3. pp. 206-214
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 215-290
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  1. Selected Bibliography
  2. pp. 291-294
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. 295-298
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 299-308
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