Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

...even begun) without the encouragement and support of various people. Their help often came at the most opportune moments. I would like to express my gratitude to those who guided me at various stages of my intellectual...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-18

...of postwar history have scarred the surface of this painting, which stands on the brink of total disappearance. Yet the pilot and the artist insist upon their existence through the remaining fragments of paint. It is this tension between the process...

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Chapter I. The Bomb, Hirohito, and History: The Foundational Narrative of Postwar Relations between Japan and the United States

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pp. 19-46

...argue that the bomb was a cruel weapon that should never have been used: peace could have been attained without it. Each side’s characterization of the bomb, however, is ultimately vested in a moral judgment that condemns the two countries to conflicting...

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Chapter II. The Age of the Body

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pp. 47-72

...survivors of the war, their bodies were the only material objects they managed to rescue from the destruction of the air raids. As Hirohito began actively traveling through the war-torn country and mingling with the Japanese people, the image of the emperor standing...

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Chapter III. A Nation That Never Is: Cultural Discourse on Japanese Uniqueness

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pp. 73-103

...Japan’s subordination to the United States was obvious: expressing nationalistic sentiments in political terms—asserting Japan’s political sovereignty in international politics—required its members to face what the foundational narrative managed to conceal...

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Chapter IV. Naming the Unnameable

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pp. 104-130

...postwar period were projected back onto Japan’s past: Japan had always already been fragmentary and open to foreign cultural elements. Maruyama’s and Kato ’s discourses, which commanded much attention in the 1950s, managed...

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Chapter V. From the Anti–Security Treaty Movement to the Tokyo Olympics: Transforming the Body, the Metropolis, and Memory

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pp. 131-163

...Quoting statistics indicating the increasing institutionalization of birth and death, Ueno detects the dissipating ontological darkness behind the disappearance of physical darkness. In 1955, only 18 percent of births took place in hospitals, while 82 percent...

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Chapter VI. Re-presenting Trauma In Late-1960s Japan

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pp. 164-198

...of history, the defeat of Japan, which postwar Japan was eager to leave behind. Both Nosaka and Mishima deploy the literary theme of repetition as a means with which to re-present the trauma of Japan’s defeat. By reenacting the trauma through...

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Conclusion

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pp. 199-210

...atrocious war crimes committed by the Japanese army. At various locations in Manchuguo, from 1936 until Japan’s defeat, Unit 731, the biological warfare unit, killed more than three thousand human subjects (mostly Chinese) in experimenting on...

Notes

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pp. 211-252

Bibliography

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pp. 253-274

Index

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pp. 275-284