In this Book

summary

Reforming the World offers a sophisticated account of how and why, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, American missionaries and moral reformers undertook work abroad at an unprecedented rate and scale. Looking at various organizations such as the Young Men's Christian Association and the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions, Ian Tyrrell describes the influence that the export of American values had back home, and explores the methods and networks used by reformers to fashion a global and nonterritorial empire. He follows the transnational American response to internal pressures, the European colonies, and dynamic changes in global society.

Examining the cultural context of American expansionism from the 1870s to the 1920s, Tyrrell provides a new interpretation of Christian and evangelical missionary work, and he addresses America's use of "soft power." He describes evangelical reform's influence on American colonial and diplomatic policy, emphasizes the limits of that impact, and documents the often idiosyncratic personal histories, aspirations, and cultural heritage of moral reformers such as Margaret and Mary Leitch, Louis Klopsch, Clara Barton, and Ida Wells. The book illustrates that moral reform influenced the United States as much as it did the colonial and quasi-colonial peoples Americans came in contact with, and shaped the architecture of American dealings with the larger world of empires through to the era of Woodrow Wilson.

Investigating the wide-reaching and diverse influence of evangelical reform movements, Reforming the World establishes how transnational organizing played a vital role in America's political and economic expansion.

Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Series Page, Copyright Page, Dedication
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Abbreviations
  2. p. xi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-10
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. PART I: Networks of Empire
  2. pp. 11-12
  1. CHAPTER 1 Webs of Communication
  2. pp. 13-27
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 2 Missionary Lives, Transnational Networks: The Misses Margaret and Mary Leitch
  2. pp. 28-46
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. PART II: Origins of American Empire
  2. pp. 47-48
  1. CHAPTER 3 The Missionary Impulse
  2. pp. 49-73
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 4 The Matrix of Moral Reform
  2. pp. 74-97
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 5 Blood, Souls, and Power: American Humanitarianism Abroad in the 1890s
  2. pp. 98-120
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. PART III: The Challenge of American Colonialism
  2. pp. 121-122
  1. CHAPTER 6 Reforming Colonialism
  2. pp. 123-145
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 7 Opium and the Fashioning of the American Moral Empire
  2. pp. 146-165
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 8 Ida Wells and Others: Radical Protest and the Networks of American Expansion
  2. pp. 166-188
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. PART IV: The Era of World War I and the Wilsonian New World Order
  2. pp. 189-190
  1. CHAPTER 9 States of Faith: Missions and Morality in Government
  2. pp. 191-208
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 10 To Make a Dry World: The New World Order of Prohibition
  2. pp. 209-226
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CONCLUSION: The Judgments of Heaven: Change and Continuity in Moral Reform
  2. pp. 227-246
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 247-308
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 309-322
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9781400836635
Print ISBN
9780691145211
MARC Record
OCLC
656359070
Pages
336
Launched on MUSE
2015-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
N
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.