Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-v

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-ix

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

This volume is, in accordance with the aims of the series in which it appears, a somewhat opinionated introductory survey of its subject, at a level suitable for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate students of philosophy, or the general reader with...

Acknowledgments

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p. xiii

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Chapter One. Introduction

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pp. 1-15

Inquiry, it is said, aims at the truth. Yet it’s doubtful there is any such thing as the truth. So it might be better to say that inquiry aims at truths, and better still to say that different inquiries from archeology to zoology aim at different truths from...

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Chapter Two. Tarski

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pp. 16-32

Tarski was, by his own account, primarily a mathematician, though also “perhaps a philosopher of a sort.” He foresaw important applications for a notion of truth in mathematics, but also saw that mathematicians were suspicious of that notion, and...

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Chapter Three. Deflationism

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pp. 33-51

In turning from Tarski’s work to the deflationist-realist- antirealist debate we are turning from work largely motivated by concerns about the paradoxes to work more directly motivated by questions about the nature of truth. About this work there...

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Chapter Four. Indeterminacy

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pp. 52-67

The equivalence principle (“Saying something is true is equivalent to just saying it”) has been less controversial than deflationism’s other theses, but it has been challenged by examples of what we will call indeterminacy. These are cases where we have a question...

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Chapter Five. Realism

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pp. 68-82

Even in traditional philosophy, the label “realism” had multiple uses whose connections with each other were anything but clear. There was, for instance, realism about universals (properties and relations), as opposed to conceptualism and nominalism,...

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Chapter Six. Antirealism

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pp. 83-101

As mentioned at the beginning of the preceding chapter, in traditional philosophy there were several debates pitting a group called “realists” against a group called something else—a different something else in each debate. The realists were those who...

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Chapter Seven. Kripke

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pp. 102-115

Tarski was the most prominent advocate of the inconsistency theory of truth, notoriously maintaining that the intuitive notion of truth is self-contradictory. (Holding, like many positivistically inclined philosophers of his day, that languages come equipped...

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Chapter Eight. Insolubility?

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pp. 116-134

Those engaged in mainly technical work of the kind considered in the preceding chapter do not generally discuss at any length whether their constructions are to be regarded as models describing our intuitive notion of truth, showing it to be consistent, or as...

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Further Reading

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pp. 135-141

The topic of truth leads off in multiple directions into others. Let us list some sources where the reader interested in one or another of these directions can pursue it further, taking the various topics in order by the chapter in this work to which they are most...

Bibliography

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pp. 143-152

Index

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pp. 153-158