Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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p. v

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

The following is an expanded and revised version of the Spinoza Lectures given at the University of Amsterdam in April and May of 2009. The idea was to combine an interpretation of what I and many others regard as the most...

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Introductory Remarks

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pp. 1-5

One of Hegel’s main concerns in the revolutionary book he wrote in the German city of Jena while only in his thirties, his Phenomenology of Spirit, is a familiar modern philosophical concern: the attempt to understand the various...

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CHAPTER ONE: On Hegel’s Claim That Self-Consciousness Is “Desire Itself ” (Begierde überhaupt)

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pp. 6-53

Kant held that what distinguishes an object in our experience from the mere subjective play of representations is rule-governed unity. His famous definition of an object is just “that in the concept of which a manifold is united”...

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CHAPTER TWO: On Hegel’s Claim That “Self-Consciousness Finds Its Satisfaction Only in Another Self-Consciousness”

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pp. 54-87

You all at this moment know what you are doing—reading a book about Hegel, let us say—and, as Elizabeth Anscombe among others made famous, you know it not by observation (the way you would know that someone else is reading...

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Concluding Remarks

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pp. 88-97

In ¶184, Hegel sums up what he takes himself to have shown to be the basic “movement,” as he calls it, of selfconsciousness. Self-consciousness, that is, is never the direct presence of anything like a “self-object” to itself; it is a processual...

Index

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pp. 99-103