Cover

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Series information,Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. ii-v

Contents

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pp. vii-vii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-ix

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

This publication was made possible in part by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York (Carnegie Scholars 2006), although the statements made and views expressed in this work are my responsibility alone. The American Philosophical Society and University Research Foundation of the University of Pennsylvania gave funds that ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xv-xvi

Note on Transliteration, Translation, and Spelling

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pp. xvii-xvii

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CHAPTER 1: The American Missionary Encounter in Egypt

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pp. 1-17

In 1854 American Presbyterian missionaries arrived in Egypt as part of a larger Anglo-American Protestant movement that aimed for universal evangelization. Protected by the armor of British imperial power and later by mounting American global influence, their enterprise flourished during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries ...

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CHAPTER 2: The American Mission, Coptic Reform, and the Making of an Egyptian Evangelical Community, 1854–82

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pp. 18-47

In 1852, four years after the U.S. government installed its first American-born consul in Egypt,1 Dr. J. G. Paulding of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church mission in Damascus, Syria, visited Egypt to recover his health. Writing to leaders of his church in Pennsylvania, Paulding praised Egypt as an open field for Christian ...

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CHAPTER 3: The Colonial Moment of the American Mission, 1882–1918

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pp. 48-95

The period from 1882 to 1918 was an important chapter in modern Egypt, the British Empire, and the Anglo-American Protestant missionary movement. It began with Britain’s invasion and occupation of Egypt, and ended with the closure of World War I and the defeat of the Ottoman Empire. Egyptians had to face in 1882 the onset of de facto ...

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CHAPTER 4: Egyptian Nationalism, Religious Liberty, and the Rethinking of the American Mission, 1918–45

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pp. 96-148

During the American Presbyterian mission’s first sixty years in Egypt, missionaries occasionally endured the vituperation of Coptic bishops and priests and taunts from Muslim crowds. But such events had been isolated and had not tempered missionaries’ hopes. The situation began to change in the 1920s when challenges appeared ...

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CHAPTER 5: The Mission of the American University in Cairo

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pp. 149-178

In 1916, Charles R. Watson sent a letter to the United Presbyterian Church of North America, resigning his position as secretary of its foreign mission board in Philadelphia. With the strong support of this church and its missionary wing, Watson had been laying the foundation for a Christian university in Egypt. He was resigning to devote ...

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CHAPTER 6: Turning to the Life of the Church: American Mission in an Age of Egyptian Decolonization and Arab-Israeli Politics, 1945–67

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pp. 179-214

Egypt had been technically independent since 1922, a constitutional monarchy since 1923, and a member of the League of Nations since 1937. Yet by the time World War II ended in 1945, Egyptian nationalists felt that the country was still lacking some basic trappings of sovereignty. Britain continued to maintain troops in the Suez Canal Zone ...

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CONCLUSION: Conversions and Transformations

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pp. 215-232

Viewing the long stretch of the mission’s history, from 1854 to 1967, four periods stand out. The first extended from 1854 to 1882, and began when American Presbyterians, inspired by the idea of universal evangelization, initiated their mission in Egypt. Constrained by social strictures against conversion from Islam, the Americans focused ...

Notes

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pp. 233-282

Bibliography

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pp. 283-306

Index

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pp. 307-318