Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-v

Contents

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p. vii

List of Figures

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

The research for Born and Made was supported by two of the national research councils in the United Kingdom, the Economic and Social Research Council and the Medical Research Council, under their cosponsored Innovative Health Technologies (IHT) Programme (research award...

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Preface

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pp. xv-xxii

This book tells the story of a specific technique in a particular country and during a distinct historical period, but it addresses a general theme— of how to account for the social dimensions of new biomedical technologies. The technique of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is of interest...

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Introduction. Babies by Design?

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pp. 1-24

One of the late twentieth century’s most infamous offspring, the “designer baby” has become, alongside the clone, a familiar figure in debates about new reproductive and genetic technologies in what has come to be known as the “postgenomic” era. Like the iconic image of the...

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Chapter 1. What Is PGD?

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pp. 25-74

3 May 2003. The glossy cover of the Guardian Weekend magazine features a provocative image of a sonogram of a fetus reading a volume of Proust to accompany an article by Bill McKibben warning of the dangers of the designer baby era.1 The reconstructed scientific image challenges...

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Chapter 2. Studying PGD

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pp. 75-93

Analyzing the social life of PGD requires moving across widely disparate sites and materials, from media representations and scientific articles to interviews with policy makers and medical practitioners. It also requires a range of methodologies, from semistructured interviews to policy analysis...

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Chapter 3. Getting to PGD

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pp. 94-131

In the same way there is no single definition of PGD, so too there are several different ways of “getting to PGD”—for scientists, clinicians, genetic counselors, patients, and researchers. Each of these involves a different path of approach, and consequently a different sense of arrival....

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Chapter 4. Going Through PGD

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pp. 132-162

Once a couple have decided to explore the possibility of PGD, and have made an appointment at the clinic, they attend what is known as their initial consultation session to meet with several different members of the PGD team. This session is designed both to provide more detailed information...

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Chapter 5. Moving On from PGD

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pp. 163-195

Everyone who undergoes PGD will eventually have to end active engagement with treatment. For a minority, this will come as a logical progression following the birth of one or more unaffected children. For the majority of couples, however, “reaching the end of the road” turns out, like...

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Chapter 6. Accounting for PGD

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pp. 196-217

The preceding chapters have introduced a range of divergent perspectives on PGD—from patients, clinicians, scientists, policy makers, journalists, bioethicists, philosophers, and other commentators as well as from the media, government agencies, and the voluntary sector. Together...

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Conclusion. PGD Futures?

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pp. 218-229

As noted at the outset of this account of PGD, there are several reasons why it has become not only a focal point of contestation over the future of reproductive biomedicine, but itself a condensed signifier of broader anxieties symbolized by the figure of the “designer baby.” Situated at the...

Appendix

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pp. 231-232

References

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pp. 233-248

Index

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pp. 249-256