Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 5

read more

Foreword

Dr. Antonio Brack Egg

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 6

After an arduous effort of 45 years of study, Birds of Peru is being published. This book had its beginnings in fieldwork initiated by John P. O’Neill in 1961, during which time he and his colleagues conducted ornithological explorations and collected bird specimens in some of the remotest parts of Peru. ...

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 7

Conceptually this book originated in 1974. At that time John O’Neill was a seasoned veteran with over a decade of experience in ornithological research and exploration in Peru. Ted Parker was a greenhorn, an undergraduate invited by O’Neill to participate on a months-long expedition to Peru. ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-11

During many years of fieldwork, research, writing, and illustrating, we have received an extraordinary amount of assistance from countless friends and colleagues. ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 12

Peru is one of the richest countries in the world for birds, with 1,800 species. This book is a guide to the field identification of all birds recorded in Peru and in offshore waters within 200 nautical miles of the Peruvian coast. ...

read more

How to Use This Book

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 12-17

For each species, we present color figures, species accounts, and with few exceptions a distribution map. We include brief introductions to many (but not all) families, and to some genera or species groups. We use these short accounts to introduce species-rich families, or to summarize information that is similar across a group of related species. ...

read more

Topography of Peru

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 18-19

The topography of Peru is very complex, resulting in a delightful variety of habitats and bird species (fig. 4). A dominant feature of Peru is the Andean cordillera, which runs north/south down the length of country. The Andes interrupt the westward flow of air across the Amazon Basin of South America. ...

read more

Habitats of Peru

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 20-21

The highest parts of the Andes, the Puna, are above treeline and are covered in dry grassland up to about 5000 m, variably laced with wet meadows, bogs, lakes, and streams. Above 5000 m, most land is unvegetated rock and snow. ...

Glossary of Bird Topography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-25

read more

Molts and Plumages

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 26

Birds undergo a series of molts throughout their lives. In most species all feathers are replaced once a year; in many species, there also is a second, incomplete molt in which part of the plumage (typically that of the body) is replaced again. Consequently, in many species there is a period (immediately following a complete molt) when all feathers of the body are fresh; ...

read more

Cautionary Note Regarding Seabird Identification

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 27

Knowledge of the distribution and seasonal occurrence of seabirds in Peru is very incomplete. A number of species not yet reported from Peru, most of which are not discussed in this volume, may well occur, especially far at sea near the limits of Peru’s territorial waters. ...

read more

Conservation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-29

Humans and birds have coexisted in Peru, the site of several great pre-Columbian civilizations, for millennia; throughout that time humans have been modifying the landscape to better suit their needs. In modern times, however, the natural habitats of Peru, and the birds and other species that depend upon them, face unprecedented levels of threat. ...

read more

Species Accounts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 30-643

Tinamous are terrestrial and cryptically colored. Superficially resemble tailless quail but usually forage singly or as adult (male) with 1 or 2 juveniles. Heard much more often than are seen. Prefer to escape on foot; when flushed, explosively rocket away before dropping quickly into cover. Tinamus roost in trees, all other species on the ground. Forest species primarily eat fallen fruit. ...

Vocal Credits

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 644

Vocal References

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 645

Artists’ Credits

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 646

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 647-664