Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-xii

The year 2006 was not a banner year for race relations. The congressional elections featured yet another racially coded television campaign ad: a blonde, white woman leering at the camera, asking the African American senatorial candidate from Tennessee, Harold Ford, to “call me.” ...

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

read more

Chapter 1 Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-21

When Franklin Roosevelt signed the Wagner Act in 1935, giving workers the right to form unions and bargain collectively with their employers, African Americans accounted for less than 1 percent of the labor movement. Over the next half century, the number of black workers in unions increased from an estimated fifty thousand to more than three million, ...

read more

Chapter 2 The Dual Development of National Labor Policy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-43

“In the past few weeks,” Chas Bickford, the general manager of Young’s Motor Freight Lines, wrote in a letter to his terminal manager, “I have encountered several complaints from the shippers and receivers of Freight in Houston due to the fact that the majority of our drivers are colored, ...

read more

Chapter 3 The NAACP Confronts Racism in the Labor Movement

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-69

“Before you dream up a torrential rebuttal for my signature,” wrote NAACP Executive Secretary Roy Wilkins to his dogged and abrasive labor director, Herbert Hill, in 1960, “I would suggest a quiet retreat and a communing with nature, one of those Yogi-Gandhi businesses where the soul is examined to see whether or not some fault lies within, rather than with those without.”1 ...

read more

Chapter 4 The Legal State

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-97

In the Spring of 1968, speaking before a packed audience of building and construction trade union leaders from around the country, Peter Schoemann, president of the Building Trades, made a startling announcement. He called on union locals to immediately institute widespread and stringent affirmative action plans in their hiring and apprenticeship programs. ...

read more

Chapter 5 Labor Law and Institutional Racism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 98-127

With everything gained, something is lost. Much was gained by the court-led civil rights victories of the labor movement. Today, more than a third of the labor movement is represented by people of color. The national union leadership has been slower to reflect this dramatic demographic change, ...

read more

Chapter 6 Conclusion: Law and Democracy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 128-140

With each passing year, the New Deal’s image as a fundamental turning point in America’s political and socioeconomic life is increasingly challenged. The New Deal’s electoral coalition is fractured, if not outright broken, and although some notable exceptions may be found, ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-194

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-202