Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This book began as four Martin Classical Lectures at Oberlin College in April, 1999, under the auspices of Jim Helm and Tom Van Nortwick. I laid the groundwork for these lectures in Fall, 1998, as a pampered Resident in Classical Studies at the American Academy in Rome. ...

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Prologue In Search of Persius

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pp. 1-15

The two missing words in the first line are, “of Donne.” Omit these, and Edmund Gosse might as well have been writing about Persius, who much influenced the “harsh and crabbed” late Elizabethan style of Hall, Marston, and Donne in their satires, and whose notorious obscurity they may have adopted, in some part, for their own protection. ...

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Chapter One: Performing Privately

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pp. 16-55

Here, more or less, are the facts, according to the unusually reliable Vita that has come down to us. Persius was born in Volaterrae (modern Volterra) in northwest Etruria on 4 December A.D. 34. He died of a stomach ailment on 24 November A.D. 62, shortly before his twenty-eighth birthday. ...

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Chapter Two: Seeking Integrity

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pp. 56-101

Persius's Satire 1 marks a third, seemingly final displacement of Roman satire from the public stages, whether of theater or dinner-party, where vice would ordinarily be denounced and folly mocked. Lucilius could not be Aristophanes, Horace could not be Lucilius, and now Persius cannot be Horace. ...

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Chapter Three: Exploring Freedom

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pp. 102-129

It is hard, for many reasons, to talk about Persius and Roman politics. Although allusions to Nero and his court have often and easily been suspected in the Satires, starting with King Midas (allegedly removed from Satire 1 by Cornutus, lest Nero think the satire was aimed at him—as of course, on one level, it was)—still, ...

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Chapter Four: Life, Death, and Art

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pp. 130-160

Birth, death, and wills: the hard facts available to the biographer help us ground the author as a real and vulnerable human being like ourselves. Chapter 4, accordingly, deals largely with life and death issues, both within the satire book and without. How do the Satires fit into the larger picture of Persius’s life, with its social privileges and responsibilities? ...

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Epilogue from Persius to Juvenal

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pp. 161-180

When you move on from Persius to Juvenal, with whom he is bound up in your Oxford Classical Text (as he has been in so many different texts since 1470); when you work your way through these five books of Satires, averaging 767 lines each (and Satire 6, on women, only three lines short of Persius’s entire work if you include the Choliambics), ...

Notes

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pp. 181-218

Bibliography

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pp. 219-232

General Index

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pp. 233-236

Index Locorum

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pp. 237-240