Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-v

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

I AM grateful to several friends and colleagues for their willingness to read all or part of the manuscript of my book and for offering helpful criticisms, many of which I have incorporated into my text. Thanks especially to: Isobel Armstrong, Stefanos Geroulanos, Meira Likierman, David Niremberg, Gabrielle Spiegel, Toril...

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INTRODUCTION: From Guilt to Shame

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pp. 1-16

WHAT is the logic of torture? In an article on prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, Mark Danner has shown that the methods used to soften up and interrogate detainees by American military personnel can be traced back to techniques developed by the CIA in the 1960s. The best known manual of...

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CHAPTER ONE: Survivor Guilt

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pp. 17-55

ON THE eve of the evacuation of Auschwitz at the end of the war, Paul Steinberg nearly slapped a dying man. By then a well-protected, eighteen-year-old “veteran” whose cool and calculating survival techniques had both impressed and chilled fellow prisoner Primo Levi, Steinberg had been asked to help keep...

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CHAPTER TWO: Dismantling Survivor Guilt

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pp. 56-92

IN 1976, the concepts of survivor guilt and identification with the aggressor were subjected to an attack widely held to be so persuasive that there is an important sense in which they never fully recovered their former prestige. In his critique, The Survivor: An Anatomy of Life in the Death Camps, Terrence Des Pres aimed...

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CHAPTER THREE: Image and Trauma

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pp. 93-122

IN 1985, two physicians, Elizabeth Brett and Robert Ostroff, published a paper on the centrality of the image to the conceptualization of posttraumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Their article had a polemical intent. They claimed that researchers had failed properly to appreciate the significance of imagery in the diagnosis and...

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CHAPTER FOUR: Shame Now

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pp. 123-156

SHAME’S RISE to prominence in the United States is a relatively recent phenomenon. To be sure, the emotion of shame figures importantly in numerous philosophical, literary, critical and other writings extending all the way back to the ancient Greeks. But from the start of the twentieth century until the early 1960s,...

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CHAPTER FIVE: The Shame of Auschwitz

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pp. 157-179

THE ITALIAN philosopher Giorgio Agamben has won widespread recognition and esteem in Europe and the United States for his reflections on political philosophy, ethics, and the law. His Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive (1999) offers an analysis of life under extremity as epitomized by...

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Conclusion

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pp. 180-186

IN THE PREVIOUS chapter, I ended on a somewhat ethical note, which is to say that my discussion of Agamben’s views on shame turned out to be at least implicitly a critique of his position on moral as well as intellectual grounds. Nor do I wish to deny that there is an ethical component to my objections to his work. Not...

Appendix

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pp. 187-191

Index

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pp. 193-200