Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

...tirelessly to reduce fatalities. Over the years, both have spotted gaps in my assumptions about Faulkner and suggested means to correction. They, to whom I dedicated the book, are part of a network of Faulknerians whose writing informs the work: I think particularly of Anne Goodwyn Jones, whose delighted skepticism regularly persuades me to reconsider; Peter...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

...instrument, and in circumstances not of their own design, they, to adapt Marx, are practically unconscious concerning large portions of their practice. Yet that practice, so much incomplete matter made from words, materializes within an economy whose historical conditions form, and take formal complexity from, linguistic work. Five sentences built upon begged...

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CHAPTER ONE: Earthing The Hamlet

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pp. 11-41

...Beaufort is a banker of uncertain origin and questionable probity, who stabilized his liquidities by marrying Regina Dallas, “a penniless beauty . . . [from] one of America’s most honoured families,” given “‘droit de cité’ . . . in New York society” by her relation to the Mansons and the Rushworths.2 Miss Jackson’s ellipses contain two options: “like . . . “ an advertisement...

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CHAPTER TWO: Comparative Cows: Reading The Hamlet for Its Residues

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pp. 42-59

...decides for Houston. His decision can only be read as class-interested. In the late 1880s fencing was the linchpin of the owners’ determination to control labor: a cropper or small renter who lacked common grazing rights had to hire a mule from the landowner, buy butter and bacon from the owner’s commissary, and, above all, plant the cash crop in order to cover...

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CHAPTER THREE: Revenants, Remnants, and Counterrevolution in “The Fire and the Hearth”

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pp. 60-86

...Although the Civil War had freed the slave, it had done so only for southern landowners to bind him again in an alternative form of “dependency”: for chattel slavery read debt peonage. Consequently, the postbellum agricultural worker, most typically living under forms of constraint, was, in the words of the economic historian...

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CHAPTER FOUR: “Pantaloon in Black” and “The Old People”: Migration, Mourning, and the Exquisite Corpse of African American Labor

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pp. 87-118

...plantation South, by 1942 historical conditions existed for the extraction of black from white. For two decades, whiteness had whitened by way of steady out-migration. With the decline of tenantry and the relaxation of the structure enforcing dependency, white, in the last instance, had less reason to be black. The first three stories of...

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CHAPTER FIVE: Reading the Ledgers: Textual Variants and Labor Variables (with Noel Polk)

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pp. 119-155

...“flank.”2 At either end, “The Old People” exhibits associative transformations rendered only slightly less shocking by their not being singular. The first four stories in Go Down, Moses, read cumulatively, release a whispered ur-narrative, or more properly an ur-narrative kit, whose constituent parts (bed; woman under erasure; male cross-racial couple; corpse) with each emergence advance toward emergency. The nub of that emergency, or...

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CHAPTER SIX: Find the Jew: Modernity, Seriality, and Armaments in A Fable

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pp. 156-178

...though set during a single week of the Great War, addresses militarization in a more extensive sense. The eleven years of the novel’s writing include: the last years of World War II (1943–45); the explosion of the first atomic bomb (August 1945); the Red Scare, reaching into the State Department and toward the Pentagon (1947–mid-1950s); the testing of the first hydrogen bomb...

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CHAPTER SEVEN: “The Bugger’s a Jew”: A Fable as Melancholic Allegory

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pp. 179-202

...supreme commander’s sexuality. In 1918, aged sixty-two, the “old” general apparently approaches what Faulkner elsewhere spoke of as ungendered peace, but the biography of his missing years (1877–circa 1914), fabricated over two meetings by his contemporaries (graduates of the St Cyr military academy) in Paris (1877) and Zermatt (1887–88), suggests a life founded on a systematic negation of sexuality. Since the life is collectively and...

Notes

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pp. 203-234

Index

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pp. 235-251