Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

Michael Walzer

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pp. vii-xii

...question.” I mean, two humane answers; we won’t be talking in this volume about the other kind. The question itself might be phrased as follows: What political space is there for Jews in the modern world? The first answer points toward citizenship in inclusive democratic states; the second answer points toward...

PART I: POLITICAL ORDER AND CIVIL SOCIETY

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One: Obligation: A Jewish Jurisprudence of the Social Order

Robert M. Cover

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pp. 3-11

...Every legal culture has its fundamental words. When we define our subject as human rights, we also locate ourselves in a normative universe at a particular place. The word “rights” is a highly evocative one for those of us who have grown up in the post-Enlightenment secular society of the West. Even those among...

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Two: Judaism and Civil Society

Suzanne Last Stone

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pp. 12-33

...Rabbinic writers do not produce theories; they produce commentaries on a biblical or talmudic text, codes of law, and legal responsa. These sources, moreover, are extremely diverse, covering over two millenniums of history, and were for the most part generated in premodern exile, when Jews lacked a state of...

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Three: Civil Society and Government

Noam J. Zohar

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pp. 34-49

...The answer depends as much upon how civil society is defined as upon any investigation into Judaic sources. According to one rather strict conception, the entire notion of civil society—and the ideals, problems, and solutions attributed to it—is situated within the framework of modern ideologies of individualism and...

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Four: Autonomy and Modernity

David Biale

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pp. 50-54

...ways unique. Like Islam, the Jewish tradition is political in nature: its laws are intended to be the laws of the state. On the other hand, since Jews did not possess a state for most of their history, the political character of the tradition was necessarily circumscribed. As Noam Zohar argues in his excellent excursus...

PART II: TERRITORY, SOVEREIGNTY, AND INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY

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Five: Land and People

David Novak

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pp. 57-82

...Now one of the structures of any such defined human community is the place that it occupies. One could very well say that even when a human community does not regard its present place of occupation as permanent (as has been the case with the Jewish people for much of her history in exile), it nevertheless aspires...

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Six: Contested Boundaries: Visions of a Shared World

Noam J. Zohar

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pp. 83-95

...traditional sources. Because of the character of Judaism as a religious tradition focused on one particular people, the analysis often appears to deal exclusively with Jewish or Israeli experience. But my intent, paralleling that of David Novak in the preceding chapter, is to draw insights from this experience that...

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Seven: Diversity, Tolerance, and Sovereignty

Menachem Fisch

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pp. 96-120

...within contemporary Judaism in the West—Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform—each standing for a cascade of further divisions. The three movements differ primarily in their attitude to halakah, the code of Jewish law. Whereas Orthodox Jews accept halakah as the first place of reference and sole arbiter of authority, Conservative Judaism sees halakah as a crucial source of value...

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Eight: Responses to Modernity

Adam B. Seligman

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pp. 121-127

...work has shown how a polyphony of voices constitutes the core moment of the Jewish legal tradition. Furthermore, and in terms of our interest here, it is well to remember that Jewish Orthodoxy, which Menachem has decided to take up in his essay, emerged in the nineteenth century as a reaction to modernizing...

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Nine: Judaism and Cosmopolitanism

David Novak

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pp. 128-146

...matter of contemporary political discourse, he or she must first indicate how any theology, which stems from the perspective of a singularly constituted faith community, can possibly contribute to discussing any normative issue defined largely by those who do not share this faith or any faith. I think the answer...

PART III: WAR AND PEACE

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Ten: Commanded and Permitted Wars

Michael Walzer

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pp. 149-168

...war and peace indeed find a place, though a very limited one, within the Jewish tradition. One might even say that there is an ongoing argument, and I will try to describe its central features in this chapter. But the argument is at best tangential to, and often at cross-purposes with, standard just war theory and international...

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Eleven: Prohibited Wars

Aviezer Ravitzky

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pp. 169-181

...if what these sources have to say on the subject is partial and fragmented, for developing a contemporary Jewish ethic of war. The sources in question, however, are in the nature of things quite diverse. They have been composed by representatives of many schools, both of halakah and of Jewish thought...

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Twelve: Judaism and the Obligation to Die for the State

Geoffrey B. Levey

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pp. 182-208

...define their relations and responsibilities to the host powers under whose authority they have variously been classed as aliens, residents, and citizens. And now, again, they are reestablished in their own sovereign state of Israel, in whose short history the call to arms has been unfortunately all too frequent. Yet the obligation to die for the state is not a question that enjoys special treatment...

Contributors

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pp. 209-210

Index

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pp. 211-217