Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

...appreciate the contributions made by other people to what is then published under my name. While naming people in acknowledgments is always hazardous, nevertheless it is necessary to try to thank some of those whose willingness to engage with my work was an absolutely necessary working condition. Invaluable research assistance was provided by Dawn Moore for several chapters and by Maureen Simpkins and Paula Dupuis...

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CHAPTER ONE: Introduction

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pp. 1-27

...knowledge relations, truth relations. While theology has often served as a public arena for the playing out of disputes about how and where to seek the truth, in the present day, and particularly in largely secular multicultural societies, law has become a privileged site in which people either seek the truth themselves or comment on the truth-seeking efforts of others. This dimension of law is not...

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CHAPTER TWO: The Art of Drawing the Line: Judicial Knowledges of Community Morality and Community Harms

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pp. 28-53

...draw a line separating legally stigmatized images and words from the larger universe of representations inciting sexual desire. Explorations of how legal authorities impose sexual norms through law often conclude that law is just another mechanism for sexual oppression, misogyny, homophobia, and/or repression. This kind of...

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CHAPTER THREE: Forensic Gaze: Law’s Search for Moral Clues

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pp. 54-85

...perspective to critique legal moralism. And yet when one looks at various legal moves to define and regulate bodily vices and bodily disorder, one rarely finds bodies as such, that is, whole bodies. What one finds is a proliferation of bodily parts, substances, and gestures. Reading Les Moran’s thoughtful account of the complex semiotics of plainclothes police officers’ surveillance of men’s public bathrooms...

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CHAPTER FOUR: Beyond Sexuality?

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pp. 86-111

...our collective understanding of that elusive entity “sex,” whose historicity and flexibility has often been declared but seldom carefully investigated. It is important not to exaggerate the reach of the “new”: numerous areas of North American law, particularly in the United States, remain wholly contained within the terms of Foucault’s famous analysis of sexuality—the distinction between governing sex through acts, as in the criminal law or in religious injunctions...

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CHAPTER FIVE: “The Lifestyle That Fits the Doctrine of Sexual Orientation”

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pp. 112-140

...to give a name to political struggles. “Gay liberation” was the most popular term of art in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This analogized the homosexual rights movement to women’s liberation (which had not yet been replaced by feminism) and to national liberation movements. The term “gay liberation,” however, has now become archaic. Politically both activists and politicians...

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CHAPTER SIX: Police Science, British Style: Pub Licensing and Knowledges of Urban Disorder

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pp. 141-166

...which civility and prosperity would emanate from the built environment as naturally as possible. Working toward such a utopia involved not only prohibiting a whole range of activities, from vagrancy to public drunkenness, but also positively encouraging and even demanding particular modes of conduct from the citizenry. For example, sumptuary laws, a key part of early Renaissance experiments...

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CHAPTER SEVEN: “Common Knowledge Must Enter the Equation Somewhere”: Knowledge as Responsibility

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pp. 167-192

...Continuing to explore how authority is built and used in the work of law by studying the legal field of alcohol regulation, this chapter first undertakes a close study of how government officials in the province of Ontario make determinations of drunkenness for purposes of licensing decisions. Whereas in England...

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CHAPTER EIGHT: Racial Masquerades: White Inquiries into “the Indian Style of Life”

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pp. 193-221

...in many countries formerly within the British Empire. Examining the operation of these laws in a broad-stroke manner suggests that, although liquor laws are no longer race-specific on their face, they still play a role in constituting racial and cultural identities. That racespecific liquor laws and their less race-specific successors construct “Indianness” is, of course, hardly a surprising...

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CHAPTER NINE: Conclusion

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pp. 222-228

...fields that lie between the high-level knowledges of scientists and experts and the lay, experiential understanding of law’s practical workings documented by the “everyday life of law” tradition, we have encountered certain knowledge processes—which are simultaneously power processes—that are not exactly unknown but whose function and significance have hitherto gone unremarked. Let us first review some key findings of each chapter, followed by a few more...

Bibliography

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pp. 229-240

Index

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pp. 241-247