Series Page, Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

I would like to thank the following people for having read and commented on parts of this manuscript: Roger Bagnall, Benjamin Gampel, Catherine Hezser (who read parts of the book in early versions, and the entire manuscript for the Press), Martha Himmelfarb, Richard Kalmin, ...

Abbreviations

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pp. ix-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-16

Imperialism and Jewish Society traces the impact of different types of foreign domination on the inner structure of ancient Jewish society, primarily in Palestine.1 It argues that a loosely centralized, ideologically complex society came into existence by the second century B.C.E., collapsed in the wake of the Destruction and the imposition of direct Roman rule after 70 C.E., ...

Part I: The Jews of Palestine to 70 C.E.

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One: Politics and Society

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pp. 19-48

In this chapter I provide some of the political and social background for the discussion in chapter 2 of the functioning of a loosely integrated Palestinian Jewish society in the later first millennium B.C.E. I focus here on some of the crucial episodes in the prehistory of Jews’ political and social integration: ...

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Two: Religion and Society before 70 C.E.

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pp. 49-100

I begin my account of Palestinian Jewish society and the impact of foreign rule on its integration by observing how the three pillars of ancient Judaism—the one God, the one Torah, and the one Temple—cohere in a single neat, ideological system. I will then disturb this coherence, first, by observing the messiness, diversity, and unpredictability of the effects of this system ...

Part II: The Jews in Palestine from 135 to 350

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Three: Rabbis and Patriarchs on the Margins

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pp. 103-128

In part 2, I aim to provide a description of a society that disintegrated under the impact of an imperialism sharpened by the failure of the two Palestinian revolts. In this part I will give close attention to the interpretation of evidence because my view of the history of Palestine from 135 to c.350 is revisionist and requires argumentation. ...

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Four: Jews or Pagans? The Jews and the Greco-Roman Cities of Palestine

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pp. 129-161

If the rabbis and their Torah were marginal, and the constitutional role of the Torah was now assumed by the Roman government, where did that leave the apparently still numerous part of post–Bar Kokhba revolt Palestinian society that remained Jewish, however tenuously? ...

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Five: The Rabbis and Urban Culture

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pp. 162-176

We have already seen that the rabbis shared a territory with Greco-Roman urbanity.1 They, too, were concentrated and exercised what influence they had, primarily in the “Jewish” cities of Palestine and the larger villages of Lower Galilee, and secondarily in proximate cities like Joppa, Caesarea Maritima, ...

Part III: Synagogue and Community from 350 to 640

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Six: Christianization

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pp. 179-202

In this part of the book I attempt to describe some aspects of the novel and distinctive Jewish culture that emerged in late antiquity (c. 350–640) as the integrative ideology of the Jews. In this chapter I will argue that one of the main causes of the rejudaization of the Jews was the christianization of the Roman Empire. ...

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Seven: A Landscape Transformed

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pp. 203-214

The landscape of high imperial Palestine was dominated by the pagan city. It was there that wealth was concentrated, and there that patterns of expenditure generated by the Greco-Roman ideology of euergetism resulted in the production of monumental structures and public writing.1 ...

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Eight: Origins and Diffusion of the Synagogue

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pp. 215-239

The synagogue was not invented in late antiquity. By the time it reached the point of its greatest diffusion, it had been in existence for at least eight hundred years. What follows is intended as a warning against overestimating the social and cultural importance of the synagogue before late antiquity. ...

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Nine: Judaization

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pp. 240-274

The diffusion of the synagogue is evidence for judaization. By this I mean the reemergence of some version—altered but recognizable— of the ideological complex described in part 1 of this book as the ordering principle of the public life of most Jews. ...

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Ten: The Synagogue and the Ideology of Community

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pp. 275-290

Late antique Jews regarded themselves as constituting religious communities and used a special terminology to convey the idea.1 Inscriptions from Jericho, Bet Shean, Susiyah, Caesarea, Huldah, Husefa-Usfiyyeh, Bet Alfa, Maon, and Hammat Gader mention gifts made to synagogues ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 291-292

The main argument of this book has been that attempts to make sense of the remains of ancient Judaism must consider the effects of shifting types of imperial domination. The complex, loosely centralized but still basically unitary Jewish society that may be inferred from the artifacts of the last two hundred years of the Second Temple period ...

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 293-316

Index

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pp. 317-320