Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

This book is a study in Jewish political theory. Jewish political theory can mean one of two things: either it conceives how a Jewish polity is to be constituted or it conceives how the Jewish political tradition can contribute to a multicultural polity. In some ways this book is both of these kinds of studies, and in other ways it is neither of them. ...

Abbreviations Used in Text

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-35

In modern discussions of political theory, the favored terms seem to be “individual and society” or “society and individual.” Indeed, the very ordering of these terms by any modern political theorist quickly shows on which side of the great debate over the priority of one entity to the other he or she stands. ...

read more

Chapter I: God and Human Persons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-55

Looking into Scripture, from which all authentic Jewish thought must begin, one sees that at the most primary level, the unlimited power of God is repeatedly asserted. “See now that I, I am He and there is no power (elohim) along with me. I kill and I give life; there is no one who can escape my hand” (Deuteronomy 32:39). ...

read more

Chapter II: Human Persons and God

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-76

At first glance, it surely seems impertinent to assume that humans may make any claims on God. After all, are not humans the creatures and God the creator? How can a creature make a claim on his or her creator? By the time of completed creation, is God not already through with us? On what ground could we possibly stand up to make any such claim? ...

read more

Chapter III: God and Covenanted Community

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-98

Heretofore, we have examined the relationship between God and human persons in terms of the claims each makes upon the other. Taking rights as primary claims within a normative order, we have seen that all rights are originally God’s as creator. The belief that a creator has claims on his creatures is found in many if not all historical cultures.1 ...

read more

Chapter IV: Covenanted Community and God

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-116

As is the case in the relationship between God and persons, where initial divine claims on humans lead to subsequent human claims on God, so do God’s claims on the covenanted human community lead to the claims this community can make on God. That is, from the underived rights of God come the derived rights of his creatures, which are entitlements (zekhuyot). ...

read more

Chapter V: Between Human Persons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-152

Throughout the history of Judaism, two basic norms have been invoked in discussions of the rights and duties involved in relationships between individual persons. These basic norms are: (1) What is hateful to yourself, do not do to someone else; (2) You shall love your neighbor as yourself. ...

read more

Chapter VI: Covenanted Community and Human Persons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-186

In the Jewish tradition, it seems that the community makes four types of claims on her individual members. (1) At the most necessary level, the community requires her members not to harm one another. She does that by threatening penalties to anyone who could do so. Communal life cannot function if the members of the community feel they will not be protected from aggression by others.1 ...

read more

Chapter VII: Human Persons and Covenanted Community

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-218

The question of the rights of an individual person in relation to the duties of the community is the question of what are the just claims that an individual person can make upon the community for fulfillment. There seem to be four kinds of such individual rights: (1) the claims of an individual on the community to protect him or her from harm by others; ...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-232

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-240