Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Introduction

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pp. vii-xiv

The 1996 U.S. election confirmed, if further substantiation was needed, the centrality of entitlement programs in American politics. The charge leveled repeatedly and effectively by President Bill Clinton was that his Republican rival Robert Dole would slash Medicare and other government allowances. ...

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One: In Search of a Liberal Essence

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pp. 3-29

The history of liberalism in the twentieth century has been one of growing semantic confusion. This has resulted from two interrelated problems. First, liberalism has not been allowed to keep any fixed and specific meaning. ...

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Two: Liberalism vs. Democracy

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pp. 30-48

A process that drew attention at the turn of the century, and even earlier, was the movement from a bourgeois liberal into a mass democratic society. Not all of those who observed this process made the same judgments about it. ...

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Three: Public Administration and Liberal Democracy

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pp. 49-71

The association of public administration with liberal democracy is by now taken for granted. At the end of the twentieth century, this relation seems both natural and unavoidable. According to journalists and the authors of college textbooks, justice and freedom can only operate harmoniously in a liberal democratic welfare state. ...

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Four: Pluralism and Liberal Democracy

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pp. 72-109

Already for some time now a debate has been going on about the “New Class” and its values. Typical of this discussion is The Revolt of the Elites, in which Christoper Lasch relates America’s business and political leadership to a degenerate liberal culture. ...

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Five: Mass Democracy and the Populist Alternative

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pp. 110-134

It has long been customary to relate calls for direct democracy and for expressions of the popular will to a revolt from below. Abundant political commentary exists for this view, and one can cite, among those who expressed it,Walter Lippmann, Irving Babbitt, José Ortega y Gassett, and the framers of the American Constitution. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 135-142

The preceding study has been an exercise in what the sociologist Robert Merton called “specified ignorance.”1 No attempt has been made to chart any supposedly inevitable future for the managerial state. Nowhere is it claimed that this regime is collapsing or that existing opposition to it will succeed in changing its structure significantly. ...

Notes

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pp. 143-176

Index

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pp. 177-185