Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Foreword

PETER L. BERGER

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pp. xi-xii

...beginning in the 1960s, it also has the most rigorous definition of the separation of church and state—more rigorous even than that prevailing in France, the country that conceived the idea of laı¨cisme. This is not the place to delve into the reasons for this paradox, nor to enter into a philosophical debate over its merits. But...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

...and Anton Zijderveld in the Netherlands, Robert Whelan in Britain, Jose´ Luis Martı´nez Lo´pez-Mun˜ iz in Spain, Jan De Groof in Belgium, Jacques Georgel in France, and John Hiemstra in Canada, as well as others too many to mention here who took part in our discussions in Rotterdam and in Boston. Lawrence D. Weinberg has helped me to keep my legal citations in order, while researching his dissertation...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-12

...urban education, and then teaching educational policy, I have puzzled over the relationship between schools and families, between the wider world in which children must learn to live and the deeper world in which they will always to some extent be rooted. But if this is the continuing theme, I have come upon it (or it has come at me) in...

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1. REACHING OUT TO CIVIL SOCIETY

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pp. 13-41

...income subsidies, schooling, health care, and many other activities that in the past were carried out by voluntary efforts, local institutions, and for-profit organizations. This shift was most dramatic in Britain, which untilWorldWar II had a relatively inactive government compared with its Continental neighbors....

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2. STRINGS WITHOUT MONEY

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pp. 42-61

...come with funding but rather how government exercises a general oversight over the civil society. After all, “the courts have held that states already have the authority to regulate social-welfare ministries as a matter of police power. Thus, as a matter of juridical realism, participating in financial-assistance programs does...

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INTERLUDE

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pp. 62-73

...That root problem, the organization does not hesitate to say, “is the sin[ful] nature of people which causes them to focus on selfcentered attempts to find personal meaning and fulfillment in life.” Such efforts at self-therapy—as in much New Age practice—are sure to fail. “When one does not have a personal relationship...

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3. HOW CLOSE AN EMBRACE?

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pp. 74-98

...to faith-based organizations, in fact allow public funds to go to many that serve children and youth . . . so long as they are not schools. This chapter will describe this illogical—and uniquely American— prohibition on funding religious schools, and recent developments that could affect future policies...

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4. FUNDING WITH GOVERNMENT OVERSIGHT

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pp. 99-130

...may and may not fund. Services for small children and for adolescents, and college-level education, receive public funding without discrimination based on the religious character of the institutions that provide them, but faith-based schools...

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INTERLUDE

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pp. 131-164

...nonprofits has taken a different form than it has in the United States. The elaborated welfare state in these countries relies heavily upon institutions with a religious character to provide public services. “In the Netherlands, about 70 percent of GNP is allocated by government in some way, but only 10 percent of GNP is directly controlled by...

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5. PROFESSIONAL NORMS

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pp. 165-192

...work and in education, how they developed, and the difficulties that they can pose—as alternate and conflicting systems of meaning—for faith-based organizations. In chapter 6 we will discuss the employment policies and practices of faith-based organizations, and how antidiscrimination statutes and professional norms can threaten...

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6. EMPLOYMENT DECISIONS

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pp. 193-211

...maintain its integrity of mission. It is safe to say that an organization whose staff are all thoroughly and consciously committed to furthering the same mission and have thought through what that means for teaching, counseling, and other services will have little difficulty using public funds when the terms on which they are provided...

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INTERLUDE

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pp. 212-240

...director of Place of Promise, a residential treatment center for the homeless in Boston, want nothing to do at all with government funding, as they fear it will lead to inevitable infringement on their autonomy and corruption of their spiritual character: “Our identity is the most important thing to us. . . . We are an organism...

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7. LOSS—AND RECOVERY—OF NERVE

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pp. 241-265

...original purpose. This may happen as a result of a kind of “loss of nerve” on the part of staff and even of boards and sponsoring organizations, as they become less clear about whether the beliefs and values upon which the organizations were founded are still relevant to present circumstances. Professional norms (discussed...

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8. RECOMMENDATIONS

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pp. 266-296

...from that of faith-based schools in the United States that do not but are regulated by government, and from that of other Western democracies that have lower barriers to cooperation between government and the faith-based schools and agencies...

REFERENCES

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pp. 297-310

INDEX

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pp. 311-315