Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-vii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xi

THIS BOOK IS AN EXPLICATION and a vindication of political liberalism, which I will argue provides the best way to structure public life in a multicultural, morally pluralist society. In keeping with its central message, it is written in a voice that risks impersonality in striving for a certain objectivity and impartiality. For political ...

read more

Introduction: Political Liberalism and Plurality

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-12

MODERNITY, IT MIGHT BE SAID, has produced three distinctive forms of political and social order, fascism, state socialism or communism, and democratic capitalism, but only the last has proven to be durable. While it is obviously premature to declare the “end of history,” liberalism—the political theory underlying democratic ...

read more

Moral Pluralism and Political Theory

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-35

THE “STANDARD FORM” of a political theory can be said to be “Aristotelian,” using this term in a broad sense. That is, the theorist begins with a conception of human nature, including an account of basic or essential human needs and capacities, such as the ability to reason, fundamental motivations, sociality, and emotional makeup, and a description of central human experiences, such as birth ...

read more

Appealing to Nature

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-73

ONE BROAD CLASS of responses to the problem of moral pluralism—which we can (roughly) identify as liberal—attempts to create as much scope as possible for the differences among individuals and groups to be expressed. For liberals, toleration of difference is a crucial premise or starting point. Another broad set of theories, ...

read more

From Contract to Discourse

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 74-97

“DISCOURSE” AND “contractarian” strategies are obviously closely related. They both seek to ground political and other associations on the “free agreement” of participants, and they both, therefore, must offer some account of what is meant by “free agreement.” Various theories have been proposed to answer these questions. ...

read more

Political Liberalism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 98-120

TRADITIONAL LIBERALISM sought to provide a normative framework that would make political community possible in the face of moral pluralism. What is distinctive about political liberalism is, first, that it is not based on an “ontology” of human nature but is offered as a strategy to achieve political community. Second, it rejects ...

read more

Rights, Private Property, and Welfare

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-145

POLITICAL LIBERALISM takes agency as its provisional starting point, and asks what exclusions may lurk there, and how it must be amended to include all voices in the discourse necessary to constituting a political community. This self-critical process does not proceed in a vacuum: we do not seek a standpoint that is universally ...

read more

Citizenship and Gender

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 146-162

THE SUSPICION THAT exclusions lurk in the liberal strategy has always focused on liberalism’s support of property and markets, but the issues raised in that context can and have been extended to the commitment to agency rights in general. In recent years some of the deepest and most perplexing objections to the liberal ...

read more

Are Rights Exclusive?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-189

THE LAST TWO CHAPTERS have reviewed charges that political liberalism, because of the primacy it accords agency rights, silences the voices of women and of those without property or valued skills. For some critics, these exclusions are only two examples of many, for they see agency itself as a form of exclusion. In this view, ...

read more

Democracy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 190-210

INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS, I have been arguing, are necessary to accommodate moral pluralism and to make a discourse-based polity possible. But, as we have seen in the last three chapters, a rights-based system is not without its own antinomies, its own exclusions and evasions. By providing scope for individual action, rights ...

read more

Conclusion: Consensuality—and Nonconsensuality

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-221

“THE FARTHEST I WOULD GO,” Foucault has said, “is to say that perhaps one must not be for consensuality, but one must be against nonconsensuality.” To be for consensuality would be to “grant that it is indeed under its governance that the phenomenon has to be organized” (Foucault 1984:379). In this brief interview ...

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-231

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-235