Cover

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Title Page, About the Series, Other Works in the Series, Copyright, Dedication. Quote

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Contents

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pp. ix-xii

List of Tables

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Preface

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pp. xv-xx

The aim in this book is much more than to analyze French national security policies in the 1970s, 1980s, and early 1990s, although it is an attempt to do that. Rather, my primary objective has been to try to place French security policies in the overall philosophical and political framework—the Gaullist framework—that has guided them for more than thirty years. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xxi-xxii

I have accumulated many debts during the preparation of this book and would like to acquit some of them here. First, I would like to thank my professor, adviser, colleague, and friend, David Calleo, who not only taught me more than I can adequately acknowledge in this space but who showed unwavering confidence in my ability to tackle such a challenging subject. ...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xxiii-xxvi

Part One: The Gaullist Years

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pp. 1-2

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Chapter One: Perspectives on de Gaulle

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pp. 3-22

The very distinctive elements of the Gaullist model for French national security—the absolute need for independence in decision making, a refusal to accept subordination to the United States, the search for grandeur and rang, the primacy of the nation-state, and the importance of national defense—can be explained in a number of different ways. ...

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Chapter Two: The Missing Pillar: France’s Role in the Defense of Europe in the 1950s and 1960s

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pp. 23-52

Largely through de Gaulle’s intransigence during and after World War II, France had ensured itself at least a nominal place among the world’s powers—as an occupying power in Germany, on the exclusive United Nations Security Council, and in Berlin—and repeatedly claimed to merit a leading role in NATO. ...

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Chapter Three: Manipulating Ambiguity: Military Doctrines under de Gaulle and Pompidou

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pp. 53-78

It would be imprudent to try to analyze the evolution, meaning, or fate of Gaullist security policies without at least a basic understanding of the operational military doctrines that were ostensibly behind them. What exactly were the military doctrines that successive French administrations found necessary (and so difficult) to adapt to the requirements of European defense? ...

Part Two: Struggling to Adapt

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pp. 79-80

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Chapter Four: Giscard’s Balancing Act, 1974–1981

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pp. 81-105

The seven-year presidency of Valéry Giscard d’Estaing marks the real beginning of France’s “post-Gaullist” period and, as such, presents the first opportunity to test the enduring influence of Gaullist military policies and their interaction with subsequent ones. ...

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Chapter Five: Mitterrand’s Adaptations, 1981–1986

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pp. 106-138

Any analysis of the first five years of Socialist government in the Fifth Republic must describe two important “adaptations” of French security policy. First, it must account for the French Left’s adaptation to the Gaullist model for defense, the acceptance of a set of fundamentals that the Socialist party (PS) and its leader had long rejected as unrealistic and pernicious. ...

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Chapter Six: Tensions in the Consensus, 1986–1989

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pp. 139-160

Nearly five years after the Left’s celebrated victory of May and June 1981, French politics took another historic turn. On March 16, 1986— for the first time in the history of the Fifth Republic—a coalition of opposition parties won national legislative elections before the completion of the president of the republic’s seven-year term. ...

Part Three: France in the New Europe

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pp. 161-162

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Chapter Seven: The Gaullist Legacy Today: French Security Policy in the 1990s

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pp. 163-185

The main conclusion that emerges from part 2 of this book is that French security policy during the 1970s and 1980s was profoundly influenced by Gaullist ideas and policies and that the Gaullist model was maintained by all of de Gaulle’s successors. Whereas most analysts who have studied this period have emphasized change rather than continuity, ...

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Chapter Eight: Epilogue: The Gaullist Legacy and the Post–Cold War World

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pp. 186-202

Are Gaullist ideas about France and national security still relevant more than twenty years after the General’s death? One might be tempted to answer in the negative if it were not for some striking similarities between the Europe of de Gaulle’s vision and the Europe that seems to be evolving today. ...

Notes

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pp. 203-234

Glossary of French Terms Used

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pp. 235-236

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 237-250

Index

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pp. 251-255