In this Book

Colonialism and Revolution in the Middle East
summary

In this book Juan R. I. Cole challenges traditional elite-centered conceptions of the conflict that led to the British occupation of Egypt in September 1882. For a year before the British intervened, Egypt's viceregal government and the country's influential European community had been locked in a struggle with the nationalist supporters of General Ahmad al-`Urabi. Although most Western observers still see the `Urabi movement as a "revolt" of junior military officers with only limited support among the Egyptian people, Cole maintains that it was a broadly based social revolution hardly underway when it was cut off by the British. While arguing this fresh point of view, he also proposes a theory of revolutions against informal or neocolonial empires, drawing parallels between Egypt in 1882, the Boxer Rebellion in China, and the Islamic Revolution in modern Iran.

In a thorough examination of the changing Egyptian political culture from 1858 through the `Urabi episode, Cole shows how various social strata--urban guilds, the intelligentsia, and village notables--became "revolutionary." Addressing issues raised by such scholars as Barrington Moore and Theda Skocpol, his book combines four complementary approaches: social structure and its socioeconomic context, organization, ideology, and the ways in which unexpected conjunctures of events help drive a revolution.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Tables and Map
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-22
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  1. One: Material and Cultural Foundations of the Old Regime
  2. pp. 23-52
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  1. Two: Economic Change and Social Interests
  2. pp. 53-83
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  1. Three: Body and Bureaucracy
  2. pp. 84-109
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  1. Four: The Long Revolution in Egypt
  2. pp. 110-132
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  1. Five: Political Clubs and the Ideology of Dissent
  2. pp. 133-163
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  1. Six: Guild Organization and Popular Ideology
  2. pp. 164-189
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  1. Seven: Of Crowds and Empires: Euro-Egyptian Conflict
  2. pp. 190-212
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  1. Eight: Repression and Censorship
  2. pp. 213-233
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  1. Nine: Social and Cultural Origins of the Revolution
  2. pp. 234-272
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 273-290
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 291-320
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  1. Select Bibliography
  2. pp. 321-334
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 335-341
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