Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, About the Series, Other Works in the Series, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

During this book's long passage into print, I have had a great deal of intellectual, moral, and material support. Edward Said, Lennard Davis, Nancy K. Miller, and Robert Paxton read parts of the book in its original form—as a Columbia University doctoral dissertation—and I am indebted to each of them for encouragement and advice. ...

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xviii

This book starts from a sense of the inadequacy of critical efforts to define that elusive yet indispensable category of nineteenth-century fiction,“realism.”Whether evaluated positively (as it is by Harry Levin and George Levine, as well as by Georg Lukács and Fredric Jameson) or pejoratively (as it is by Roland Barthes and Stephen Heath), ...

read more

One: Medicine and Mimesis: The Contours of a Configuration

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-14

Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1782) ends with a cascade of calamities: the deaths of the libertine Valmont and his virtuous victim, Mme. de Tourvel; Chevalier Danceny’s withdrawal into celibacy as a Knight of Malta; and Mlle. de Volanges’s incarceration in a convent. Crowning these disasters is the fate of the villainous Mme. de Merteuil, recounted by Mme. de Volanges in the last letter of Laclos’s novel: ...

read more

Two: Disarticulating Madame Bovary: Flaubert and the Medicalization of the Real

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-45

Over the past twenty-odd years, semiotics has established itself as a powerful, rigorous, and at times elegant technique for the close reading of literary texts. Until recently, however, literary semioticians tended to remain fixated on the text itself, squandering the promise of Barthes’s early cultural criticism ...

read more

Three: Paradigms and Professionalism: Balzacian Realism in Discursive Context

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 46-83

Flaubert was in the midst of composing Madame Bovary when he wrote to Louise Colet, on December 27, 1852, “in the grip of a ghastly terror.” This sensation had been provoked, Flaubert went on to explain, by his discovery of an uncanny resemblance between Balzac’s Louis Lambert and his own experience: “Lambert is, in all but a few particulars, my poor Alfred. ...

read more

Four: “A New Organ of Knowledge”: Medical Organicism and the Limits of Realism in Middlemarch

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 84-119

Between Balzac and Flaubert there is at once a hiatus and a continuity: a pertinent difference that permits one to recognize a passage as quintessentially Flaubertian or Balzacian, even as one acknowledges both Balzac and Flaubert as realists. One of literary history’s tasks is to cope with such paradoxes of identity and difference by specifying the conditions and nature of literary change. ...

read more

Five: On the Realism/Naturalism Distinction: Some Archaeological Considerations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 120-129

There seems to be general agreement among literary historians that something like a “crisis of representation” afflicts realism during the last few decades of the nineteenth century, and that modernism—understood variously as “going-beyond-representation,” beginning with a text rather than an intention, or a turning inward of narrative— ...

read more

Six: From Diagnosis to Deduction: Sherlock Holmes and the Perversion of Realism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 130-147

If naturalism eagerly (some would say, all too eagerly) insists on being read in the context supplied by the sciences of its time, and in so doing establishes both its affinity with and its distance from realism as a genre, the classical detective story would seem at first glance to transcend context—whether historical or generic—altogether. ...

read more

Seven: The Pathological Perspective: Clinical Realism’s Decline and the Emergence of Modernist Counter-Discourse

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 148-174

As the emergence of pararealistic genres like naturalism and detective fiction indicates, the tensions within pathological realism, already evident in Middlemarch, do not abate but intensify as the century draws to a close, ultimately imperiling the enterprise of realism as such. ...

read more

Epilogue: Toward a New Historicist Methodology

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-192

A central concern of this book has been to show: first, how clinical medicine constitutes a certain systematic view of, and way of talking about, its object—the pathologically embodied person; and second, how, and with what consequences both for aesthetics and ideology, novelists imitate this medical praxis as they go about their work. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-226

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-235