Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-2

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Introduction: The Origins of a Crusade

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pp. 3-13

As the Christmas-time chill of the 1948 winter descended upon the city of Chicago, a middle-aged man with spectacles and a high forehead, looking appropriately professorial, addressed the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association. James Simsarian, a State Department liaison to the American delegation at the United Nations, delivered a summary of recent United Nations work in the field of human rights. He began with the most recent accomplishment: the unanimous approval of a Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which he described as “a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations.” ...

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1. Defining a Crusade, 1941–1943

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pp. 14-49

On January 6, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered a somber State of the Union address to a concerned Congress that had witnessed Nazi Germany’s conquest of most of Western Europe and Japan’s occupation of Indochina and parts of China. Ever the careful politician, Roosevelt wanted to rally the public behind expanded aid to Great Britain without fueling isolationist sentiments that such assistance would ignite war with Germany. He turned to the rhetorical language of freedom to achieve his twin goals...

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2. Implementing a Vision, 1943–1945

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pp. 50-89

After securing agreement among the Big Four in the Moscow Declaration to establish an international peacekeeping organization, the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt spent the next eight months in deep planning for its creation. The final provisions of the United Nations Charter, signed by almost 50 nations on June 26, 1945, reflected inter-Allied bargaining, Roosevelt’s own strong predilections, and pressure from American lobbying groups...

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3. A Conservative Revolution Begins, 1945–1948

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pp. 90-131

A month after Senate ratification of the United Nations Charter, P. Bernard Young, Jr., the editor of the Norfolk Journal and Guide, an African American newspaper in Norfolk, Virginia, telegraphed President Truman. He endorsed Truman’s call for free elections in Bulgaria, but asked if the president’s comments applied to the disenfranchisement of blacks in the American South...

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4. Opposition at Home and at the United Nations, 1948 –1951

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pp. 132-170

The passage of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights marked the apex of American influence within the United Nations Commission for Human Rights (UNCHR). Immediately after approving the historic document, the General Assembly gave Eleanor Roosevelt a standing ovation. Herbert Evatt, its president, proclaimed, “It is particularly fitting that there should be present on this occasion the person who, with the assistance of many others, has played a leading role in the work, a person who has raised to greater heights even so great a name—Mrs. Roosevelt, the representative of the United States of America.”...

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5. United Nations Success Breeds Failure at Home, 1945–1950

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pp. 171-209

As the United Nations Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR) drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and early versions of the covenant, other agencies pieced together the organization’s first human rights treaty. Memories of the Holocaust and of other atrocities committed during World War II led member states to draft an agreement to punish those who tried to destroy religious, national, racial, or ethnic groups...

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6. The End of a Crusade, 1951–1953

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pp. 210-247

The rising domestic and international backlash against the Genocide Convention and the human rights covenant soon forced Presidents Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower to change policy at the United Nations. The victorious struggle against the convention waged by conservative senators and leaders of the American Bar Association had generated the publicity, legal arguments, and political connections that they now used to attack the human rights covenant...

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Conclusion: The Impact of a Crusade, 1953–2011

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pp. 248-260

Between 1941 and 1953, the United States government, often prodded by non-governmental organizations and in response to perceived diplomatic and domestic political interests, led a worldwide crusade for the international protection of human rights. The campaign, launched by President Franklin Roosevelt in the dark days of World War II as the British and the Chinese directly faced the forces of Fascism alone, derived as much from current events as from an American ideology as old as the Puritans...

Notes

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pp. 261-326

Bibliography

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pp. 327-348

Index

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pp. 349-362